The Rubin
Tibetan Monks Create Sand Mandala Live

Last fall, the Rubin Museum of Art’s Education team hosted a weekend of open houses for various audiences including K-12 educators, university professors, and families. Throughout the weekend, over 150 educators, professors, and families came to watch three Tibetan Buddhist monks create a sand mandala dedicated to Green Tara, a Buddhist deity and protector. To accompany the creation of the mandala, the Rubin Museum’s Education Department presented a series of activities, talks, and tours to demonstrate the many ways that we use mandalas for our school, university, and family programs. Below you can find a recap of the weekend, in pictures.

Before any sand was poured, the monks carefully drew out the mandala using rulers and compasses.
Before any sand was poured, the monks carefully drew out the mandala using rulers and compasses.
To create rich details and ornamentation, the monks layer the brightly colored sand, forming patterns.
To create rich details and ornamentation, the monks layer the brightly colored sand, forming patterns.
Tashi Chodron, Coordinator of Adult and Academic Programs, led a Q&A session with the monks.
Tashi Chodron, Coordinator of Adult and Academic Programs, led a Q&A session with the monks.
During their final ritual, the monks make many mudras, or symbolic hand gestures. This particular mudra is meant to symbolize a three dimensional mandala.
During their final ritual, the monks make many mudras, or symbolic hand gestures. This particular mudra is meant to symbolize a three dimensional mandala.



Add Your Thoughts

Comments are moderated, and will not appear on this site until the Rubin has approved them.



Enter this word: