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  • Guided Public Tour

Explore Himalayan art and cultures during this engaging tour led by an expert docent. Through close looking at art and conversation, visitors gain greater insights into current exhibitions and the Rubin collection. Tour themes may include Mindfulness, Living Traditions, Stories of Migration, the Role of the Female, Tradition and Technology, and Environmental Sustainability, among others. 

Tours meet at 2:00 PM at the base of the spiral staircase and last approximately 45 minutes. Browse our exhibitions to plan your next visit.

 

Lead support for the Rubin Museum is provided by Bob and Lois Baylis, Barbara Bowman, E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, Dharma Joy Foundation, Noah P. Dorsky, Fred Eychaner, Christopher J. Fussner, Agnes Gund, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Global, the Estate of Lisina M. Hoch, Lilly Endowment, Henry Luce Foundation, The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation, Mellon Foundation, Matt and Ann Nimetz, The Randleigh Foundation Trust, Shelley and Donald Rubin, Tiger Baron Foundation, and Ellen Bayard Weedon Foundation.

General operating support of the Rubin Museum of Art is provided by the Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation, Daphne Hoch Cunningham and John Cunningham, Anne E. Delaney, Dalio Philanthropies, Janet Gardner, Dan Gimbel of NEPC, LLC, The Prospect Hill Foundation, Basha Rubin and Scott Grinsell, Linda Schejola, Eric and Alexandra Schoenberg, Eileen Caulfield Schwab, Jesse Smith and Annice Kenan, Tsherin Sherpa, Tong-Tong Zhu and Jianing Liu, with generous donations from the Museum’s Board of Trustees, individual donors and members, and corporate and foundation supporters.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

 

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Photo by Filip Wolak, 2023
  • Guided Public Tour

Explore Himalayan art and cultures during this engaging tour led by an expert docent. Through close looking at art and conversation, visitors gain greater insights into current exhibitions and the Rubin collection. Tour themes may include Mindfulness, Living Traditions, Stories of Migration, the Role of the Female, Tradition and Technology, and Environmental Sustainability, among others. 

Tours meet at 2:00 PM at the base of the spiral staircase and last approximately 45 minutes. Browse our exhibitions to plan your next visit.

 

Lead support for the Rubin Museum is provided by Bob and Lois Baylis, Barbara Bowman, E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, Dharma Joy Foundation, Noah P. Dorsky, Fred Eychaner, Christopher J. Fussner, Agnes Gund, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Global, the Estate of Lisina M. Hoch, Lilly Endowment, Henry Luce Foundation, The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation, Mellon Foundation, Matt and Ann Nimetz, The Randleigh Foundation Trust, Shelley and Donald Rubin, Tiger Baron Foundation, and Ellen Bayard Weedon Foundation.

General operating support of the Rubin Museum of Art is provided by the Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation, Daphne Hoch Cunningham and John Cunningham, Anne E. Delaney, Dalio Philanthropies, Janet Gardner, Dan Gimbel of NEPC, LLC, The Prospect Hill Foundation, Basha Rubin and Scott Grinsell, Linda Schejola, Eric and Alexandra Schoenberg, Eileen Caulfield Schwab, Jesse Smith and Annice Kenan, Tsherin Sherpa, Tong-Tong Zhu and Jianing Liu, with generous donations from the Museum’s Board of Trustees, individual donors and members, and corporate and foundation supporters.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

 

Image
Photo by Filip Wolak, 2023
  • Guided Public Tour

Explore Himalayan art and cultures during this engaging tour led by an expert docent. Through close looking at art and conversation, visitors gain greater insights into current exhibitions and the Rubin collection. Tour themes may include Mindfulness, Living Traditions, Stories of Migration, the Role of the Female, Tradition and Technology, and Environmental Sustainability, among others. 

Tours meet at 2:00 PM at the base of the spiral staircase and last approximately 45 minutes. Browse our exhibitions to plan your next visit.

 

Lead support for the Rubin Museum is provided by Bob and Lois Baylis, Barbara Bowman, E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, Dharma Joy Foundation, Noah P. Dorsky, Fred Eychaner, Christopher J. Fussner, Agnes Gund, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Global, the Estate of Lisina M. Hoch, Lilly Endowment, Henry Luce Foundation, The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation, Mellon Foundation, Matt and Ann Nimetz, The Randleigh Foundation Trust, Shelley and Donald Rubin, Tiger Baron Foundation, and Ellen Bayard Weedon Foundation.

General operating support of the Rubin Museum of Art is provided by the Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation, Daphne Hoch Cunningham and John Cunningham, Anne E. Delaney, Dalio Philanthropies, Janet Gardner, Dan Gimbel of NEPC, LLC, The Prospect Hill Foundation, Basha Rubin and Scott Grinsell, Linda Schejola, Eric and Alexandra Schoenberg, Eileen Caulfield Schwab, Jesse Smith and Annice Kenan, Tsherin Sherpa, Tong-Tong Zhu and Jianing Liu, with generous donations from the Museum’s Board of Trustees, individual donors and members, and corporate and foundation supporters.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

 

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Photo by Filip Wolak, 2023
  • No Guided Public Tour

There will be no guided public tour on Saturday, July 6. Saturday public tours will resume on Saturday, July 13.

 

Lead support for the Rubin Museum is provided by Bob and Lois Baylis, Barbara Bowman, E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, Dharma Joy Foundation, Noah P. Dorsky, Fred Eychaner, Christopher J. Fussner, Agnes Gund, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Global, the Estate of Lisina M. Hoch, Lilly Endowment, Henry Luce Foundation, The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation, Mellon Foundation, Matt and Ann Nimetz, The Randleigh Foundation Trust, Shelley and Donald Rubin, Tiger Baron Foundation, and Ellen Bayard Weedon Foundation.

General operating support of the Rubin Museum of Art is provided by the Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation, Daphne Hoch Cunningham and John Cunningham, Anne E. Delaney, Dalio Philanthropies, Janet Gardner, Dan Gimbel of NEPC, LLC, The Prospect Hill Foundation, Basha Rubin and Scott Grinsell, Linda Schejola, Eric and Alexandra Schoenberg, Eileen Caulfield Schwab, Jesse Smith and Annice Kenan, Tsherin Sherpa, Tong-Tong Zhu and Jianing Liu, with generous donations from the Museum’s Board of Trustees, individual donors and members, and corporate and foundation supporters.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

 

Image
Photo by Filip Wolak, 2023
  • No Guided Public Tour

There will be no guided public tour on Sunday, June 30 and Sunday, July 7. Sunday public tours will resume on Sunday, July 14.

 

Lead support for the Rubin Museum is provided by Bob and Lois Baylis, Barbara Bowman, E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, Dharma Joy Foundation, Noah P. Dorsky, Fred Eychaner, Christopher J. Fussner, Agnes Gund, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Global, the Estate of Lisina M. Hoch, Lilly Endowment, Henry Luce Foundation, The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation, Mellon Foundation, Matt and Ann Nimetz, The Randleigh Foundation Trust, Shelley and Donald Rubin, Tiger Baron Foundation, and Ellen Bayard Weedon Foundation.

General operating support of the Rubin Museum of Art is provided by the Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation, Daphne Hoch Cunningham and John Cunningham, Anne E. Delaney, Dalio Philanthropies, Janet Gardner, Dan Gimbel of NEPC, LLC, The Prospect Hill Foundation, Basha Rubin and Scott Grinsell, Linda Schejola, Eric and Alexandra Schoenberg, Eileen Caulfield Schwab, Jesse Smith and Annice Kenan, Tsherin Sherpa, Tong-Tong Zhu and Jianing Liu, with generous donations from the Museum’s Board of Trustees, individual donors and members, and corporate and foundation supporters.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

 

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Photo by Filip Wolak, 2024
  • LIFE AFTER… WITH AMANDA PALMER

Songwriter and author Amanda Palmer curates and hosts three exchanges around what happens when significant, and sometimes unexpected, life events lead to opportunities for personal transformation. Life after… COVIDafter… wellnessafter… telling the truth on yourself will constitute some of the topics explored on Friday evenings in November with her guests: artist Gonkar Gyatso (November 3), eco-writer Sophie Strand (November 10), and activist Noor Tagouri (November 17).

Who are we after we experience a catastrophic life event? Who are we after we fall in and out of love? Who are we after we change jobs? Who are we after we almost die, but make it out alive? Amanda and each of her guests are not afraid of these big questions. In Amanda’s words, “Perhaps we’ll find some answers, but more likely, we’ll all feel less alone and make one another laugh.”

In this second conversation, Amanda speaks with eco-writer Sophie Strand about Life After… Wellness.

Join us before the event at 6:15 PM for a docent-led exhibition tour of Death Is Not the End.

 

About the Speakers

Sophie Strand is a writer based in the Hudson Valley who focuses on the intersection of spirituality, storytelling, and ecology. She is the author of The Flowering Wand, The Madonna Secret, and a forthcoming memoir on disability and ecology, The Body is a Doorway. Subscribe for her newsletter at sophiestrand.substack.com. And follow her work on Instagram @cosmogyny and at www.sophiestrand.com.

 

Headshot of Amanda Palmer

Amanda Palmer is a best-selling author, feminist, songwriter, community leader, pianist, and ukulele-enthusiast who simultaneously embraces and explodes traditional frameworks of music, theater, and art. She first came to prominence as part of the punk cabaret duo The Dresden Dolls, earning global applause for their inventive songcraft and wide-ranging theatricality. Her solo career featured such groundbreaking works as the crowd-funded Theatre Is Evil, which made a top 10 debut on the Billboard 200 in 2012 and remains the top-funded original music project on Kickstarter. In 2013, she presented “The Art of Asking” at the annual TED conference, which has been viewed over 20 million times worldwide. Palmer expanded her philosophy into the New York Times best-selling memoir, The Art of Asking: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Let People HelpSince 2015, Palmer has used the patronage platform Patreon to fund her artwork with an average of 15,000 patrons micro-supporting her creations each month. In 2019, Palmer released her solo album, There Will Be No Intermission. Her first appearance at the Rubin was with neuroscientist David Eagleman on the subject of Finding Time. She can also be heard on Season 1 of the Rubin’s AWAKEN podcast.

 

Death Is Not the End is supported by the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, Ellen Bayard Weedon Foundation, Robert Lehman Foundation, and The Prospect Hill Foundation.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

Death Is Not the End is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

  • LIFE AFTER… WITH AMANDA PALMER

Songwriter and author Amanda Palmer curates and hosts three exchanges around what happens when significant, and sometimes unexpected, life events lead to opportunities for personal transformation. Life after… COVIDafter… wellnessafter… telling the truth on yourself will constitute some of the topics explored on Friday evenings in November with her guests: artist Gonkar Gyatso (November 3), eco-writer Sophie Strand (November 10), and activist Noor Tagouri (November 17).Who are we after we experience a catastrophic life event? Who are we after we fall in and out of love? Who are we after we change jobs? Who are we after we almost die, but make it out alive? Amanda and each of her guests are not afraid of these big questions. In Amanda’s words, “Perhaps we’ll find some answers, but more likely, we’ll all feel less alone and make one another laugh.”

In this final conversation, Amanda speaks with activist Noor Tagouri about Life After… Telling The Truth on Yourself.

Join us before the event at 6:15 PM for a docent-led exhibition tour of Death Is Not the End.

 

About the Speakers

Headshot of Noor Tagouri

Noor Tagouri is a formidable force in the world of journalism and storytelling. Her groundbreaking 2018 documentary, Sold In America, delved deep into the complexities of the US sex trade, earning her a prestigious Gracie Award for Best Investigative Series.

In 2022, Noor launched the Webby-nominated investigative series REP: A Story About the Stories We Tell, which explores the concepts of representation and objectivity in media. With a finger on the pulse of her communities’ concerns, Noor Tagouri continues to transform media, making it more inclusive, representative, and soulful than ever before.

 

Headshot of Amanda Palmer

Amanda Palmer is a best-selling author, feminist, songwriter, community leader, pianist, and ukulele-enthusiast who simultaneously embraces and explodes traditional frameworks of music, theater, and art. She first came to prominence as part of the punk cabaret duo The Dresden Dolls, earning global applause for their inventive songcraft and wide-ranging theatricality. Her solo career featured such groundbreaking works as the crowd-funded Theatre Is Evil, which made a top 10 debut on the Billboard 200 in 2012 and remains the top-funded original music project on Kickstarter. In 2013, she presented “The Art of Asking” at the annual TED conference, which has been viewed over 20 million times worldwide. Palmer expanded her philosophy into the New York Times best-selling memoir, The Art of Asking: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Let People HelpSince 2015, Palmer has used the patronage platform Patreon to fund her artwork with an average of 15,000 patrons micro-supporting her creations each month. In 2019, Palmer released her solo album, There Will Be No Intermission. Her first appearance at the Rubin was with neuroscientist David Eagleman on the subject of Finding Time. She can also be heard on Season 1 of the Rubin’s AWAKEN podcast.

 

Death Is Not the End is supported by the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, Ellen Bayard Weedon Foundation, Robert Lehman Foundation, and The Prospect Hill Foundation.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

Death Is Not the End is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

  • Healing Practices Exhibition Tour

Join Tibetan medicine doctor Kunga Wangdue for a free online tour of Healing Practices: Stories from Himalayan Americans, on view through January 16, 2023. Through close looking and conversation, learn more about the featured exhibition and the variety of ways individuals employ healing in their day to day lives. Dr. Wangdue will also discuss the importance of diet in Tibetan medicine for the healing process. This tour will last approximately 60 minutes.

Tibetan medicine doctor Kunga Wangdue was born in Tibet and began his Buddhist studies at the age of eight and studied Tibetan language and Buddhist philosophy at Drepung Monastery in Lhasa. Doctor Wangdue then began his extensive study of Tibetan medicine and graduated from Tibetan Medical and Astrology College in India in 1996. He had the privilege of completing a year-long apprenticeship under Senior Menpa Kunga Gyurme, former personal physician of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. From 1998 to 2002, he served as a clinical practitioner in Nepal. Dr. Wangdue, the head of the Kungye Healing Center in New York, is a highly respected Tibetan medicine practitioner in the Tibetan Himalayan community of New York.

Major support for Healing Practices: Stories from Himalayan Americans is provided by The Prospect Hill Foundation as well as by generous donations from the Museum’s Board of Trustees, individual donors, and members.

Public support of the Rubin Museum of Art is provided by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of the Governor and the New York State Legislature.

Prospect Hill Foundation
  • From Reflection to Practice

Join this interactive workshop and open forum on culture programming for and with people living with dementia, led by Assistant Manager of Docents & Access Programs Maggie Woolums and Teaching Artist and Creative Aging Advocate Magda Kaczmarska. You will learn about the partnership between the Rubin’s long running program Mindful Connections and Stories in the Moment, an evidence-informed program that combines dance, movement, and storytelling. Experience a demonstration from a portion of this recent multi-sensory program series, hear findings and reflections from participants in the series, and participate in open discussion with other museum access professionals and teaching artists about how multidisciplinary collaborations can extend the field of access programming.


About the teachers

Magda Kaczmarska is a teaching artist and creative-aging advocate based in New York City. She received her MFA in dance performance and choreography and her BS in biochemistry and molecular biophysics from the University of Arizona. She spent ten years working in neuropharmacology research and over 15 years in community-based education settings in dance and creative expression for persons of all ages, specifically older adults. She serves on the National Dance Education Organization (NDEO) Dance and Disability Special Interest Group, supporting access, equity, and inclusion in the dance education community. Magda is an Atlantic Fellow for Equity in Brain Health at GBHI, where she is working to design and expand access to creative aging programs that support brain health across the lifespan.

Maggie Woolums is the Assistant Manager of Docent & Access Programs at the Rubin Museum of Art. In this position, she oversees the Museum’s Accessibility initiatives, specifically Mindful Connections, a monthly program for adults living with dementia and their caregivers, as well as regularly scheduled programs for caregivers and senior audiences. Program themes rotate and frequently highlight current museum exhibitions. They feature staff, specially trained teaching artists, and performers that offer audiences the opportunity to interact with art through a variety of mediums. Maggie has been at the Rubin Museum for 6 years, previously as the Assistant Manager for Box Office and Group Visits in the Public Programs department. She holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the Manhattan School of Music and previously worked with senior audiences during her term as Music Director of Uptown Voices, an outreach group serving hospitals and senior residences in the New York City and Long Island area.


Mellon Foundation
The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation

Mindful Connections is supported by the Mellon Foundation and The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation.

  • Healing Through Art

Are you someone who loves getting creative? These drop-in sessions are for you. Creative expression has been cited as a powerful way to connect with yourself, alleviate stress, and find inspiration.

In this collaboration with New York University Steinhardt Graduate School of Art Therapy, graduate art therapy students guide visitors in creative art-making exercises designed to encourage self-reflection and discovery. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Healing Practices: Stories from Himalayan Americans, audiences have the opportunity to reflect on themes of healing and well-being explored within the show.

Advanced registration is not required. This offering is included as part of your general admission ticket for the galleries. Visit the 6th floor between 1 and 3 PM on Saturdays through May 28 to participate.

Healing Through Art sessions are under the direction of Healing Practices: Stories from Himalayan Americans Community Advisory Group member Ikuko Acosta and inspired by the themes in the show.

About the teacher

Ikuko Acosta, PhD, ATR-BC, LCAT

Director of the Graduate Art Therapy Program, New York University

About the Rubin Museum Advisory Council member

Ikuko has been involved in the field of art therapy for the past 37 years as an art therapist and art theory educator. Her clinical expertise is with the adult psychiatric population; she worked with a diagnostic team in the admissions unit in a county psychiatric hospital in New Jersey. Her main research interest is developing an aesthetically based pictorial analysis within a framework of psychodynamic approach.

Ikuko has been active in promoting cross-cultural application of art therapy worldwide, and has been presenting and teaching in more than 20 countries over the past 25 years.

Ikuko’s most recent funded research, a collaboration with the Parkinson’s unit at NYU Langone Medical Center, focused on the impact of creative experience on people with Parkinson’s disease.

Support for Healing Practices: Stories from Himalayan Americans is provided by The Prospect Hill Foundation. General operating support of the Rubin Museum of Art is provided by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Office of the Governor and the New York State Legislature, as well as by generous donations from the Museum’s Board of Trustees, individual donors, and members.

  • Healing Through Art

Are you someone who loves getting creative? These drop-in sessions are for you. Creative expression has been cited as a powerful way to connect with yourself, alleviate stress, and find inspiration.

In this collaboration with New York University Steinhardt Graduate School of Art Therapy, graduate art therapy students guide visitors in creative art-making exercises designed to encourage self-reflection and discovery. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Healing Practices: Stories from Himalayan Americans, audiences have the opportunity to reflect on themes of healing and well-being explored within the show.

Advanced registration is not required. This offering is included as part of your general admission ticket for the galleries. Visit the 6th floor between 1 and 3 PM on Saturdays through May 28 to participate.

Healing Through Art sessions are under the direction of Healing Practices: Stories from Himalayan Americans Community Advisory Group member Ikuko Acosta and inspired by the themes in the show.

About the teacher

Ikuko Acosta, PhD, ATR-BC, LCAT

Director of the Graduate Art Therapy Program, New York University

Ikuko has been involved in the field of art therapy for the past 37 years as an art therapist and art theory educator. Her clinical expertise is with the adult psychiatric population; she worked with a diagnostic team in the admissions unit in a county psychiatric hospital in New Jersey. Her main research interest is developing an aesthetically based pictorial analysis within a framework of psychodynamic approach.

Ikuko has been active in promoting cross-cultural application of art therapy worldwide, and has been presenting and teaching in more than 20 countries over the past 25 years.

Ikuko’s most recent funded research, a collaboration with the Parkinson’s unit at NYU Langone Medical Center, focused on the impact of creative experience on people with Parkinson’s disease.

Support for Healing Practices: Stories from Himalayan Americans is provided by The Prospect Hill Foundation. General operating support of the Rubin Museum of Art is provided by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Office of the Governor and the New York State Legislature, as well as by generous donations from the Museum’s Board of Trustees, individual donors, and members.

  • Ugadi: Spring Festival of the Telugus

Celebrate the springtime Telugu festival, Ugadi, with the Rubin Museum’s New York City”“based community partner Telugu Literary and Cultural Association, which represents the largest Telugu-speaking population in the world outside of India.

Ugadi, or Yugadi, is celebrated as the first day of the New Year by people in Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, and Karnataka, as well as Telugu-speaking communities all over the world. On this day, people make a special chutney called Ugadi Pachadi, with each family putting its own unique spin on the recipe.

Traditionally, each family member consumes a teaspoon of Ugadi Pachadi, which features six symbolic flavors (sweet, sour, salty, bitter, astringent, and spicy) that represent the upcoming experiences and emotions of the New Year.

This afternoon event includes an invocation, group classical dance, and live, interactive preparation of the chutney. Register in advance to receive a list of ingredients to make the chutney from home along with us.

This program is hosted by Tashi Chodron, Himalayan Cultural Programs and Partnerships, Rubin Museum of Art, and followed by a Q&A.


You can participate and prepare the Ugadi Pachadi during the program! Download the recipe.


Telugu Literary and Cultural Association (TLCA) is a nonprofit organization and the first Telugu association to be established in North America. Founded in 1971, the organization is home to Telugu-speaking Indians who originate from the South Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana. The United States has the highest Telugu population in the world outside of India at approximately half a million people.

TLCA’s mission is to preserve the Telugu culture and its linguistic heritage for current and future generations of Telugu people.

Members take pride in the community developed by TLCA, which allows them to celebrate the Telugu language and its rich traditions while contributing to their children’s social and emotional development.

  • Diwali: Festival of Lights

Celebrate Diwali or Deepavali, the festival of lights, with the Rubin Museum, India Home, and the Telugu Literary and Cultural Association and bring light to these challenging times. This virtual gathering features opening music from Neil and Maitreya Padukone, a father-son duo who play guitar, sitar, and tabla in the Indo-Latin fusion band Salsa Masala, and recipients of awards from the Queens Council on the Arts and The Shed. India Home seniors and Telugu Literary and Cultural Association will showcase their talent, and community members will share Diwali song and dance, including the traditional folk dance form of Garba. During the themed live drawing class attendees can participate from home, and they will also learn how to create Rangoli flower designs.

An official holiday in India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, and other countries, Diwali symbolizes the spiritual victory of light over darkness, good over evil, and knowledge over ignorance. Join us in a celebration of life and light!

This program is hosted by Tashi Chodron, Himalayan Cultural Programs and Partnerships, Rubin Museum of Art, and followed by a Q&A.

About the Presenters

India Home is a nonprofit organization dedicated to addressing the needs of the Indian and larger South Asian senior citizen immigrant community. Started in 2007 by a group of healthcare professionals, India Home provides social, psychological, recreational, and spiritual services in a culturally sensitive environment.


Telugu Literary and Cultural Association is a nonprofit organization and the first Telugu association to be established in North America. Founded in 1971, the organization is home to Telugu-speaking Indians who originate from the South Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana. The United States has the highest Telugu population in the world outside of India, with approximately half a million people. TLCA’s mission is to preserve Telugu culture and its linguistic heritage for current and future generations. Members celebrate the Telugu language and its rich traditions while creating positive influences on their children’s social and emotional development.




Neil Padukone is a guitarist who blends jazz, funk, flamenco, rock, Indian, and Latin music into his work. He composes music and plays guitar, sitar, and oud in Salsa Masala, an award-winning Indo-Latin fusion band. He is the recipient of the inaugural Queens Council on the Arts Artist Commissioning Program award, which he used to present A Jackson Heights Block Party in the streets of the Queens neighborhood that inspired his Indian-Latin project in 2018. He also received the first Open Call award from The Shed and was one of the first musical acts to perform at the newest art space on Manhattan’s westside. He played lead guitar in Mugwump, a funk-jazz band he co-founded, whose self-titled album was recognized in the Village Voice and Time Out NY. Padukone also wrote and performed with his father, Maitreya, the score for The Passion of Noor Inayat Khan, a play about an Indian Sufi woman who served as a spy for the French resistance. In addition to training in jazz, Neil has studied flamenco, North Indian classical, and Latin music, and he also plays bouzouki, ukulele, and dhol.

Maitreya Padukone was inspired and initiated into the art of tabla by Pandit Nikhil Ghosh. He plays tabla in Salsa Masala, an award-winning Indo-Latin fusion band. Maitreya has accompanied Indian musicians like Steve Gorn, Ustad Sultan Khan, and Dr. Rajiv Taranath, among many others. He is co-founder of Raga Music Circle, which has organized Indian music concerts for the last 15 years. He co-wrote the score for The Passion of Noor Inayat Khan with his son. He is also a dental consultant to Jazz Foundation of America and provides pro bono dental treatment to struggling musicians. His recent collaboration with Cosmasomatics resulted in the album Jazz Maalika, a fusion of music inspired by John Coltrane and Pandit Ravi Shankar produced on his label, Saptakjazz.

Himalayan Heritage programs are supported by Heather Beth Henson.

  • Stories of the Tea-Horse Caravan Road

Kesang Tashi was a 10-year-old boy when he joined what became one of the last great mule caravan journeys across the Tibetan highlands from Chamdo to Lhasa. The young Tashi discovered Tibet as he was leaving it. He made a solemn vow in the awesome silence of the mountains to return and continue the work of his forebears. Decades later he fulfilled this promise through his devotion to revitalizing Tibet’s rug weaving heritage as the first foreign businessmen in Tibet and the last one still actively engaged. Tashi is now preparing to revive his grandfather’s wildly popular tea company, which was started in 1938.

Join Kesang Tashi in conversation with Sienna Craig, Professor of Anthropology at Dartmouth College, in a special Himalayan Heritage event to learn more about Kesang’s remarkable life story—how a young boy’s promise to return to his homeland transformed his life and that of his community for generations. The revitalization of Tibet’s rug weaving heritage with the help of old master craftsmen, followed by the revival of his grandfather’s Flaming Gem Label Tea, comprise Tashi’s swan song, as he passes the torch to the next generation of Tibetan entrepreneurs.

This program is hosted by Tashi Chodron, Himalayan Cultural Programs and Partnerships, Rubin Museum of Art, and followed by a Q&A.

About the Speakers

Kesang Tashi was born in Gyalthang in Eastern Tibet to a Khampa merchant family who, for generations, was a part of the Tea Horse Caravan trade route that ran from the frontier region of Gyalthang to Lhasa in Central Tibet and beyond to Kalimpong, the Himalayan hill town in India. He is the founder of Innerasia, a company that works directly with artisans inside Tibet to revitalize its rug weaving heritage. The company has been doing this work since as early as 1988, in the post-Cultural Revolution era, when the Tibet Autonomous Region first reopened its doors. Tashi worked with master weavers to restore the rug weaving industry by providing training and thereby generating a livelihood for a new generation of weavers, yarn carders, yarn spinners, dyers, and carvers. He also helped revive traditional hand-painted wood furniture making, thangka and miniature painting arts, and textile weaving. In the midst of these activities, it dawned on him that his return to and engagement in Tibet was in many ways continuing the unfinished work of his grandfather. Tashi is the only foreigner and business enterprise to be actively engaged in Tibet from the 1980s to present time. Tashi is a graduate of Dartmouth, and he studied Buddhist philosophy at the University of Wisconsin under Geshe Lhundup Sopa. He is a recognized authority on Tibetan rugs and has published Of Wool and Loom: Tradition of Tibetan Rugs (2006). In 2019 the BBC filmed an episode of a forthcoming series entitled One Cup, a Thousand Stories on the history of tea that features Tashi and his family’s tea story .

Sienna R. Craig is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. A medical and cultural anthropologist as well as a creative writer, she works with Himalayan and Tibetan communities in Asia and North America. Her books include The Ends of Kinship: Connecting Himalayan Lives Between Nepal and New York (2020), Healing Elements: Efficacy and the Social Ecologies of Tibetan Medicine (2012), and Horses Like Lightning: A Story of Passage through the Himalayas (2008).

Himalayan Heritage programs are supported by Heather Beth Henson.

This program is co-presented with The Latse Project and InnerAsia Rugs.

The Latse Project is a NY/NJ-based nonprofit organization that promotes literacy and knowledge sharing in the Tibetan language.

  • Museum College Career Workshop

Have you ever thought about the person who oversees exhibition design at a museum? Or wondered how to become a translator for public lectures? What about the person who runs the Rubin College Committee?

The Rubin College Committee invites interested college-age students to join us for an evening exploring nontraditional careers in the arts. Take part in intimate roundtable discussions with professionals working behind the scenes in museums, arts nonprofits, and educational spaces and discover a dream job you didn’t know existed! Come prepared with your most oddly specific questions, an open mind, and a notebook. Space is limited to keep the conversation cozy.

Free and open to all college-age young people.

After the event enjoy free admission to the galleries and the Rubin’s K2 Friday Night.

Learn More

For more information about student opportunities at the Rubin Museum and notification for the Museum College Career Workshop registration, please subscribe to our monthly Universities Email. You can also learn more at the links below:

College Committee

Internships

Volunteer Program

Apprentice Museum Educator Program

Blog Post: “How to Score a Museum Job”


Graphics created by BMCC student Minyoung Kim

  • Educator Open House

Educators who work with students of all ages are invited to explore how the Rubin Museum’s artwork can connect with their curriculum.

The Rubin’s permanent collection is an exceptional resource for educators, offering insight into the art and history of cultures from the Himalayan region, as well as a springboard for discussion of universal ideas. Through a lively discussion and gallery tours, learn how to help your students make deep and meaningful connections between their own lives and the timeless art in the Rubin’s galleries. This event will take place in the Rubin Museum Education Center.

Learn about the Rubin’s 2019 theme of POWER and our plans for 2020.

The evening includes:

  • Customized tours led by trained educators
  • Light refreshments and snacks
  • Hands-on art-making opportunities
  • Meet-and-greet with Rubin Museum staff
  • An opportunity to meet fellow educators
  • Invitation to the K2 Lounge immediately following the Open House

For more information, please email education@rubinmuseum.org.


Image Credit
Namkhai Nyingpo (8th-9th century) Performing a Long-Life Ritual Kham Province, Eastern Tibet; 19th century Pigments on cloth C2006.66.20 (HAR 678)
  • Power Play

Heat Safety Notice: The Museum is air conditioned and open to the public all day. Outdoor activities will be sheltered in shade and water misters will be administered on the street to help keep visitors cool.

Discover the power of community at the Rubin Museum’s annual Block Party. Join thousands of other New Yorkers at this outdoor event featuring art and activities for all ages inspired by the Rubin’s yearlong exploration of the power that dwells within us and flows between us.


Art-Making Activities:

  • Power Down: Create your own stress balls
  • Power On: Create a portable lamp with LED lights
  • Power Objects: Wrap and weave string around wood and stone in a project inspired by the Tibetan Namkha Nepal

Participatory Experiences:

  • Flower Power: Build a collaborative floral feast for the eyes
  • Power Couple: Ask someone at the table to trace your hands to form patterns on the long table
  • Power Nap: Recharge with a guided meditation
  • Power Poles: Get scientific with magnetic force and metallic sand
  • Power Trip: Explore constellations in the Himalayas
  • Net Walk: Artist Milcah Bassel explores movement with groups that must move in unison
  • Playgami: Origami artist Uttam Grandhi creates an AR experience with images inspired by the Rubin collection
  • Power Forward: Wind powered messages with artist Kyung-Jin Kim

Activities led by community organizations:

  • Art Connects
  • Grassroots Movement in Nepal
  • India Home
  • Jumpstart
  • Siddhartha School
  • YindaYin Coaching


Performances:

  • Fogo Azul Brazilian Women’s Drumline
  • Nepal Hip-Hop Foundation
  • Power Painting Jam curated and MC’ed by Rhiannon Catalyst with music by Building Beats
  • YindYin – Traditional Tibetan dance in celebration of the power of community
  • *ASL interpretation available for stage programming


Food:

  • Van Leeuwen Ice Cream
  • People’s Pops
  • Yanni’s Coffee
  • Cafe Serai
  • Sweetface Snoballs
  • The Commons Chelsea

The Rubin Block Party is made possible through the generosity of New York Life. Additional support has been provided by Agnes Gund, Con Edison, and India Tourism, New York.

  • Museum College Career Workshop

Are you a college student, graduate student, or recent postgraduate interested in a career in the museum world but aren’t sure where to start? Take your first steps at the Rubin Museum’s annual Museum College Career Workshop.

This free, annual event is an opportunity to meet with museum professionals, learn about the many career paths available to you, and get practical advice for your foray into the industry.

After the event enjoy free admission to the galleries and the Rubin’s K2 Friday Night.

Learn More

For more information about student opportunities at the Rubin Museum and notification for the MCCW registration, please subscribe to our monthly Universities Email. You can also learn more at the links below:

College Committee

Internships

Volunteer Program

Apprentice Museum Educator Program

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