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  • Mindfulness Meditation

For centuries Himalayan practitioners have used meditation to quiet the mind, open the heart, calm the nervous system, and increase focus. Mindfulness meditation offers a refuge from the world and an opportunity to engage more consciously.

Whether you’re a beginner, a dabbler, or a skilled meditator seeking the company of others, join expert teachers in a 45-minute weekly in-person program. Each session is inspired by a different work of art from the Rubin Museum’s collection. Designed to fit into your lunch break, the program includes an opening talk, a 20-minute sitting session, and a closing discussion. Chairs will be provided.

This week’s in-person meditation session will be led by Jon Aaron, and the theme for this month is Balance.

 

About the Teacher

Jon Aaron teaches meditation, Buddhist dharma, and is a Somatic Experience Practitioner® in New York City. He is well known as a teacher of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) as well as a trainer of new teachers of this seminal eight-week curriculum. Among his primary interests are the use of meditation and somatic work in healing trauma and working with individuals with chronic pain and grief. Recently he has been teaching for the New York Police Department in an eight-hour intervention called Cultivating Mindfulness—expanding the capacity of mind and body to work with stress, anxiety, and trauma. He is a co-founder of the MBSR Teacher Collaborative of Greater New York and a founding member of the Global Mindfulness Collaborative, and is a long-time teacher at New York Insight Meditation Center. When the pandemic hit, along with his partner he cofounded Space2Meditate, an online community of meditators that is still going strong six days a week. Learn more about Jon Aaron at www.jonaaron.net.

 

This program is presented in partnership with Sharon Salzberg and teachers from the New York Insight Meditation Center, the Interdependence Project, and Parabola Magazine and supported by the Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism.

the Interdependence Project

 

  • Mindfulness Meditation

For centuries Himalayan practitioners have used meditation to quiet the mind, open the heart, calm the nervous system, and increase focus. Mindfulness meditation offers a refuge from the world and an opportunity to engage more consciously.

Whether you’re a beginner, a dabbler, or a skilled meditator seeking the company of others, join expert teachers in a 45-minute weekly program. Each session is inspired by a different work of art from the Rubin Museum’s collection. Designed to fit into your lunch break, the program includes an opening talk, a 20-minute sitting session, and a closing discussion. Chairs are provided.

This week’s in-person meditation session will be led by Rebecca Li, and the theme for this month is Balance.

 

About the Teacher

Dr. Rebecca Li, a Dharma heir in the lineage of Chan Master Sheng Yen, is the founder and guiding teacher of Chan Dharma Community. She teaches meditation and Dharma classes, gives public lectures, and leads retreats in North America and Europe. Li is the author of Allow Joy into Our Hearts: Chan Practice in Uncertain Times, and her new book titled Illumination: A Guide to the Buddhist Method of No-Method was published by Shambhala Publications in October. She is a sociology professor and lives with her husband in New Jersey. Her talks and writings can be found at www.rebeccali.org.

 

This program is presented in partnership with Sharon Salzberg and teachers from the New York Insight Meditation Center, the Interdependence Project, and Parabola Magazine and supported by the Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism.

the Interdependence Project
  • Mindfulness Meditation

For centuries Himalayan practitioners have used meditation to quiet the mind, open the heart, calm the nervous system, and increase focus. Mindfulness meditation offers a refuge from the world and an opportunity to engage more consciously.

Whether you’re a beginner, a dabbler, or a skilled meditator seeking the company of others, join expert teachers in a 45-minute weekly program. Each session is inspired by a different work of art from the Rubin Museum’s collection. Designed to fit into your lunch break, the program includes an opening talk, a 20-minute sitting session, and a closing discussion. Chairs will be provided.

This week’s in-person meditation session will be led by Tracy Cochran, and the theme for this month is Balance.

 

About the Teacher

Tracy Cochran has been a student and teacher of meditation and spiritual practice for decades. She is the founder of the Hudson River Sangha, which is now virtual and is open to all. The link for her weekly meditations can be found on her website: tracycochran.org. In addition, Tracy has taught mindfulness meditation and mindful writing at the Rubin Museum of Art and the New York Insight Meditation Center, as well as in schools, corporations, and other venues worldwide. She is also a writer and the editorial director of Parabola, an acclaimed quarterly magazine that seeks to bring timeless spiritual wisdom to the burning questions of the day. Her writings, podcasts, and other details can be found on her website and on parabola.org.

 

This program is presented in partnership with Sharon Salzberg and teachers from the New York Insight Meditation Center, the Interdependence Project, and Parabola Magazine and supported by the Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism.

the Interdependence Project
  • Mindfulness Meditation

For centuries Himalayan practitioners have used meditation to quiet the mind, open the heart, calm the nervous system, and increase focus. Mindfulness meditation offers a refuge from the world and an opportunity to engage more consciously.

Whether you’re a beginner, a dabbler, or a skilled meditator seeking the company of others, join expert teachers in a 45-minute weekly program. Each session is inspired by a different work of art from the Rubin Museum’s collection. Designed to fit into your lunch break, the program includes an opening talk, a 20-minute sitting session, and a closing discussion. Chairs will be provided.

This week’s in-person meditation session will be led by Elaine Retholtz, and the theme for this month is Balance.

 

About the Teacher

Elaine Retholtz Headshot

Elaine Retholtz has been studying and practicing the Dharma since 1988. In addition to teaching Dharma at New York Insight, she is a certified Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) teacher and a certified MBSR teacher trainer. She is deeply interested in helping students integrate mindfulness into daily life. Elaine is committed to deepening her own understanding of issues of diversity and the way racial conditioning in the United States affects all of us—both as individuals and in relation to the institutions we are a part of, including New York Insight. She’s been involved in New York Insight’s diversity efforts for many years.

 

This program is presented in partnership with Sharon Salzberg and teachers from the New York Insight Meditation Center, the Interdependence Project, and Parabola Magazine and supported by the Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism.

the Interdependence Project
  • Mindfulness Meditation

For centuries Himalayan practitioners have used meditation to quiet the mind, open the heart, calm the nervous system, and increase focus. Mindfulness meditation offers a refuge from the world and an opportunity to engage more consciously.

Whether you’re a beginner, a dabbler, or a skilled meditator seeking the company of others, join expert teachers in a 45-minute weekly in-person program. Each session is inspired by a different work of art from the Rubin Museum’s collection. Designed to fit into your lunch break, the program includes an opening talk, a 20-minute sitting session, and a closing discussion. Chairs are provided.

This week’s in-person meditation session will be led by Kimberly Brown, and the theme for this month is Reimagine.

 

About the Teacher

Kimberly Brown is a meditation teacher and author. She leads classes and retreats that emphasize the power of compassion and kindness meditation to reconnect us to ourselves and others. Her teachings provide an approachable pathway to personal and collective well-being through effective and modern techniques based on traditional practices. She studies in both the Tibetan and Insight schools of Buddhism and is a certified mindfulness instructor. Her latest book, Navigating Grief and Loss: 25 Buddhist Practices to Keep Your Heart Open to Yourself and Others, was published in November 2022, and an updated edition of Steady, Calm, and Brave was released in January 2023. Both are published by Prometheus Books. You can learn more about Kimberly on her website.

 

This program is presented in partnership with Sharon Salzberg and teachers from the New York Insight Meditation Center, the Interdependence Project, and Parabola Magazine and supported by the Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism.

the Interdependence Project
  • Mindfulness Meditation

For centuries Himalayan practitioners have used meditation to quiet the mind, open the heart, calm the nervous system, and increase focus. Mindfulness meditation offers a refuge from the world and an opportunity to engage more consciously.

Whether you’re a beginner, a dabbler, or a skilled meditator seeking the company of others, join expert teachers in a 45-minute weekly in-person program. Each session is inspired by a different work of art from the Rubin Museum’s collection. Designed to fit into your lunch break, the program includes an opening talk, a 20-minute sitting session, and a closing discussion. Chairs are provided.

This week’s in-person meditation session will be led by Lavina Shamdasani, and the theme for this month is Reimagine.

 

About the Speaker

Lavina Shamdasani

Lavina Shamdasani is a certified compassion teacher through the Compassion Institute and Stanford University. She has taught programs focused on mindfulness, compassion, joy, and gratitude and led book club discussions and meditations for over five years. 

Lavina studied positive psychology coaching at the Wholebeing Institute and helps clients transform their lives and meet their personal and professional goals.  

 

This program is presented in partnership with Sharon Salzberg and teachers from the New York Insight Meditation Center, the Interdependence Project, and Parabola Magazine and supported by the Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism.

the Interdependence Project
  • Mindfulness Meditation

For centuries Himalayan practitioners have used meditation to quiet the mind, open the heart, calm the nervous system, and increase focus. Mindfulness meditation offers a refuge from the world and an opportunity to engage more consciously.

Whether you’re a beginner, a dabbler, or a skilled meditator seeking the company of others, join expert teachers in a 45-minute weekly in-person program. Each session is inspired by a different work of art from the Rubin Museum’s collection. Designed to fit into your lunch break, the program includes an opening talk, a 20-minute sitting session, and a closing discussion. Chairs are provided.

This week’s in-person meditation session will be led by Lama Aria Drolma, and the theme for this month is Reimagine.

 

About the Speaker

Lama Aria Drolma is an ordained Buddhist teacher in the Karma Kagyu tradition of Tibetan Buddhism and has completed over a decade of monastic study and meditation training. She is a graduate of the traditional Tibetan Buddhist retreat program spanning three years and three months, an advanced cloistered meditation training program at Palpung Thubten Choling Monastery, New York.

Lama Aria Drolma teaches worldwide, leading retreats, workshops, and corporate meditation programs, and is a popular guest speaker at universities and organizations. She emphasizes Vajrayana Buddhism and Buddhist principles, making them relevant in our everyday lives, helping us to cultivate loving kindness and compassion, and bringing about a transformation of contentment and a genuine sense of well-being.

 

This program is presented in partnership with Sharon Salzberg and teachers from the New York Insight Meditation Center, the Interdependence Project, and Parabola Magazine and supported by the Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism.

the Interdependence Project
  • Mindfulness Meditation

For centuries Himalayan practitioners have used meditation to quiet the mind, open the heart, calm the nervous system, and increase focus. Mindfulness meditation offers a refuge from the world and an opportunity to engage more consciously.

Whether you’re a beginner, a dabbler, or a skilled meditator seeking the company of others, join expert teachers in a 45-minute weekly in-person program. Each session is inspired by a different work of art from the Rubin Museum’s collection. Designed to fit into your lunch break, the program includes an opening talk, a 20-minute sitting session, and a closing discussion. Chairs are provided.

This week’s in-person meditation session will be led by Michel Pascal, and the theme for this month is Reimagine.

 

About the Speaker

Michel Pascal, a meditation teacher for 25 years, has led successful programs for prisoners, which help prevent suicides and reduce reoffending. He’s written 20 books on spirituality, including Meditation for Daily Stress: 10 Practices for Immediate Well-being. Known as “The Medicine Voice,” he’s performed at Carnegie Hall and played at the Peace Day Concert in Times Square in September 2023. In December 2023 he presented his methods at the United Nations.

 

This program is presented in partnership with Sharon Salzberg and teachers from the New York Insight Meditation Center, the Interdependence Project, and Parabola Magazine and supported by the Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism.

the Interdependence Project
  • Field of Wishes TsaTsa Workshop

Join us for a unique opportunity to contribute to the Rubin’s next exhibition Reimagine: Himalayan Art Now, opening March 15. For her installation Field of Wishes, participating artist Sonam Dolma Brauen will encircle a stupa from the Museum’s collection with 240 tsatsas. Participants will make their own tsatsas and place a paper inside with wishes for inner and world peace. Each participant’s tsatsa will be featured in the Field of Wishes installation.

In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, tsatsas are votive offerings utilized to commemorate the dead. The ashes of a deceased person are often mixed with clay and used to make figurines with tsatsa molds. These figurines are placed in sacred places to accrue positive merit for the deceased person as well as those who placed them there.

This installation holds great personal significance for the artist, as the figurines are modeled after the tsatsa mold that her family brought with them during their escape from Tibet. By inviting community participation in the creation of her work, Sonam Dolma Brauen intends to convey peace, togetherness, and connection to one another.

By attending this program, you agree to be photographed, videotaped, and/or audio recorded for promotional and educational purposes.

 

Artist Statement

“As someone who has experienced displacement and the loss of my homeland,” I have a deep understanding of the challenges and complexities that come with being uprooted from one’s cultural and geographical context. Through my installations and artworks, I explore themes of identity, belonging, and the search for a sense of home. By incorporating elements of my lived traditions, such as tsatsas . . . into my art, I aim to create new narratives that challenge the past and redefine my own identity. It allows me to share my own journey and perspectives while also inviting others to contemplate their own sense of self and place in an ever-changing world.”

 

About the Artist

Born in 1953, Sonam Dolma Brauen spent the first six years of her life living high up in the Tibetan Alps. Due to the  occupation of Tibet, she fled across the Himalayan mountains with her family to India.

At 19, she and her mother emigrated to Switzerland, where she married Swiss anthropologist and curator Martin Brauen. They have two children, Yangzom (movie director) and Tashi (artist).

Sonam Dolma Brauen, who paints mainly abstract pictures, began her art training in 1990, studying at Art School Bern. After moving to New York City in 2008, where she lived for four years, she began creating installations using materials such as monk robes from Tibet (My Father’s Death; currently on view at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, MO) and plaster tsatsas.

Globalization and displacement have had a significant impact on the artist’s perception of herself. The artist’s provocative works utilize human hairs, teeth and used ammunition shells to comment on contemporary society. Her works have been exhibited in Switzerland, Germany, Korea, Holland, USA, and Italy.

 

Reimagine: Himalayan Art Now is supported by Bob and Lois Baylis, Noah P. Dorsky, Jacques and Natasha Gelman Foundation, Dan Gimbel of NEPC, LLC, Agnes Gund, New York Life, Matt and Ann Nimetz, The Prospect Hill Foundation, Eileen Caulfield Schwab, and Taipei Cultural Center in New York.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

This project is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Image: Sonam Dolma Brauen; Field of Wishes; 2023; Clay; Courtesy of the artist
  • Field of Wishes TsaTsa Workshop

Join us for a unique opportunity to contribute to the Rubin’s next exhibition Reimagine: Himalayan Art Now, opening March 15. For her installation Field of Wishes, participating artist Sonam Dolma Brauen will encircle a stupa from the Museum’s collection with 240 tsatsas. Participants will make their own tsatsas and place a paper inside with wishes for inner and world peace. Each participant’s tsatsa will be featured in the Field of Wishes installation.

In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, tsatsas are votive offerings utilized to commemorate the dead. The ashes of a deceased person are often mixed with clay and used to make figurines with tsatsa molds. These figurines are placed in sacred places to accrue positive merit for the deceased person as well as those who placed them there.

This installation holds great personal significance for the artist, as the figurines are modeled after the tsatsa mold that her family brought with them during their escape from Tibet. By inviting community participation in the creation of her work, Sonam Dolma Brauen intends to convey peace, togetherness, and connection to one another.

By attending this program, you agree to be photographed, videotaped, and/or audio recorded for promotional and educational purposes.

 

Artist Statement

“As someone who has experienced displacement and the loss of my homeland,” I have a deep understanding of the challenges and complexities that come with being uprooted from one’s cultural and geographical context. Through my installations and artworks, I explore themes of identity, belonging, and the search for a sense of home. By incorporating elements of my lived traditions, such as tsatsas . . . into my art, I aim to create new narratives that challenge the past and redefine my own identity. It allows me to share my own journey and perspectives while also inviting others to contemplate their own sense of self and place in an ever-changing world.”

 

About the Artist

Born in 1953, Sonam Dolma Brauen spent the first six years of her life living high up in the Tibetan Alps. Due to the  occupation of Tibet, she fled across the Himalayan mountains with her family to India.

At 19, she and her mother emigrated to Switzerland, where she married Swiss anthropologist and curator Martin Brauen. They have two children, Yangzom (movie director) and Tashi (artist).

Sonam Dolma Brauen, who paints mainly abstract pictures, began her art training in 1990, studying at Art School Bern. After moving to New York City in 2008, where she lived for four years, she began creating installations using materials such as monk robes from Tibet (My Father’s Death; currently on view at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, MO) and plaster tsatsas.

Globalization and displacement have had a significant impact on the artist’s perception of herself. The artist’s provocative works utilize human hairs, teeth and used ammunition shells to comment on contemporary society. Her works have been exhibited in Switzerland, Germany, Korea, Holland, USA, and Italy.

 

Reimagine: Himalayan Art Now is supported by Bob and Lois Baylis, Noah P. Dorsky, Jacques and Natasha Gelman Foundation, Dan Gimbel of NEPC, LLC, Agnes Gund, New York Life, Matt and Ann Nimetz, The Prospect Hill Foundation, Eileen Caulfield Schwab, and Taipei Cultural Center in New York.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

This project is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Image: Sonam Dolma Brauen; Field of Wishes; 2023; Clay; Courtesy of the artist
  • Field of Wishes TsaTsa Workshop

Join us for a unique opportunity to contribute to the Rubin’s next exhibition Reimagine: Himalayan Art Now, opening March 15. For her installation Field of Wishes, participating artist Sonam Dolma Brauen will encircle a stupa from the Museum’s collection with 240 tsatsas. Participants will make their own tsatsas and place a paper inside with wishes for inner and world peace. Each participant’s tsatsa will be featured in the Field of Wishes installation.

In the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, tsatsas are votive offerings utilized to commemorate the dead. The ashes of a deceased person are often mixed with clay and used to make figurines with tsatsa molds. These figurines are placed in sacred places to accrue positive merit for the deceased person as well as those who placed them there.

This installation holds great personal significance for the artist, as the figurines are modeled after the tsatsa mold that her family brought with them during their escape from Tibet. By inviting community participation in the creation of her work, Sonam Dolma Brauen intends to convey peace, togetherness, and connection to one another.

By attending this program, you agree to be photographed, videotaped, and/or audio recorded for promotional and educational purposes.

 

Artist Statement

“As someone who has experienced displacement and the loss of my homeland,” I have a deep understanding of the challenges and complexities that come with being uprooted from one’s cultural and geographical context. Through my installations and artworks, I explore themes of identity, belonging, and the search for a sense of home. By incorporating elements of my lived traditions, such as tsatsas . . . into my art, I aim to create new narratives that challenge the past and redefine my own identity. It allows me to share my own journey and perspectives while also inviting others to contemplate their own sense of self and place in an ever-changing world.”

 

About the Artist

Born in 1953, Sonam Dolma Brauen spent the first six years of her life living high up in the Tibetan Alps. Due to the  occupation of Tibet, she fled across the Himalayan mountains with her family to India.

At 19, she and her mother emigrated to Switzerland, where she married Swiss anthropologist and curator Martin Brauen. They have two children, Yangzom (movie director) and Tashi (artist).

Sonam Dolma Brauen, who paints mainly abstract pictures, began her art training in 1990, studying at Art School Bern. After moving to New York City in 2008, where she lived for four years, she began creating installations using materials such as monk robes from Tibet (My Father’s Death; currently on view at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, MO) and plaster tsatsas.

Globalization and displacement have had a significant impact on the artist’s perception of herself. The artist’s provocative works utilize human hairs, teeth and used ammunition shells to comment on contemporary society. Her works have been exhibited in Switzerland, Germany, Korea, Holland, USA, and Italy.

 

Reimagine: Himalayan Art Now is supported by Bob and Lois Baylis, Noah P. Dorsky, Jacques and Natasha Gelman Foundation, Dan Gimbel of NEPC, LLC, Agnes Gund, New York Life, Matt and Ann Nimetz, The Prospect Hill Foundation, Eileen Caulfield Schwab, and Taipei Cultural Center in New York.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

This project is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Image: Sonam Dolma Brauen; Field of Wishes; 2023; Clay; Courtesy of the artist
  • Mindfulness Meditation

For centuries Himalayan practitioners have used meditation to quiet the mind, open the heart, calm the nervous system, and increase focus. Mindfulness meditation offers a refuge from the world and an opportunity to engage more consciously.

Whether you’re a beginner, a dabbler, or a skilled meditator seeking the company of others, join expert teachers in a 45-minute weekly in-person program. Each session is inspired by a different work of art from the Rubin Museum’s collection. Designed to fit into your lunch break, the program includes an opening talk, a 20-minute sitting session, and a closing discussion. Chairs are provided.

This week’s meditation session will be led by Sharon Salzberg, who will lead the in-person meditation remotely via Zoom. The theme for this month is Reawaken.

 

About the Speaker

Sharon Salzberg, cofounder of the Insight Meditation Society in Barre, Massachusetts, has guided meditation retreats worldwide since 1974. Her latest book is Real Change: Mindfulness to Heal Ourselves and the World. Sharon is also the author of several publications including the New York Times bestseller Real Happiness: The Power of Meditation, Faith: Trusting Your Own Deepest Experience, Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness, and Real Love: The Art of Mindful Connection. While running her own podcast, The Metta Hour, and interviewing 100+ influential voices in meditation and mindfulness movements, Sharon has regularly contributed to many onstage conversations at the Rubin.

 

This program is presented in partnership with Sharon Salzberg, and teachers from the New York Insight Meditation Center, the Interdependence Project, and Parabola Magazine and supported by the Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism.

the Interdependence Project

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