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  • Members Tour

Join us for complimentary tea in Café Serai followed by an exclusive docent-led tour of our newest exhibition, Reimagine: Himalayan Art Now.

Reimagine is a Museum-wide exhibition that brings together 32 contemporary artists from the Himalayas, Asia, and diaspora to consider how cultural heritage shapes identity. Through a wide range of media, including painting, sculpture, sound, video, installation, performance, and more, the artists explore their personal and collective histories and call attention to themes such as the fluidity of identity, spiritual practices, sense of belonging, grief, memory, and reclamation. Contemporary works are presented alongside objects from the Museum’s collection, inviting new ways of encountering traditional Himalayan art.

The tea begins in the café at 12:00 PM and the tour meets at the base of the spiral staircase at 1:00 PM.

Registration is required to attend. To register and for any questions, please email us at membership@rubinmuseum.org.

 

Reimagine: Himalayan Art Now is supported by Bob and Lois Baylis, Daphne Hoch Cunningham and John Cunningham, Noah P. Dorsky, Mimi Gardner Gates, Fred Eychaner, Jacques and Natasha Gelman Foundation, Dan Gimbel of NEPC, LLC, Agnes Gund, New York Life, Matt and Ann Nimetz, Namita and Arun Saraf, The Prospect Hill Foundation, Eileen Caulfield Schwab, Taipei Cultural Center in New York, and UOVO.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

This project is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Image credit:
Losel Yauch; Procession Immemorial; 2023; willow branches, recycled sari silk, brass bells, raffia, cotton; courtesy of the artist; photo by Dave De Armas
  • Mindfulness Meditation

For centuries Himalayan practitioners have used meditation to quiet the mind, open the heart, calm the nervous system, and increase focus. Mindfulness meditation offers a refuge from the world and an opportunity to engage more consciously.

Whether you’re a beginner, a dabbler, or a skilled meditator seeking the company of others, join expert teachers in a 45-minute weekly program. Each session is inspired by a different work of art from the Rubin Museum’s collection. Designed to fit into your lunch break, the program includes an opening talk, a 20-minute sitting session, and a closing discussion. Chairs will be provided.

This week’s in-person meditation session will be led by Tracy Cochran, and the theme for this month is Balance.

 

About the Teacher

Tracy Cochran has been a student and teacher of meditation and spiritual practice for decades. She is the founder of the Hudson River Sangha, which is now virtual and is open to all. The link for her weekly meditations can be found on her website: tracycochran.org. In addition, Tracy has taught mindfulness meditation and mindful writing at the Rubin Museum of Art and the New York Insight Meditation Center, as well as in schools, corporations, and other venues worldwide. She is also a writer and the editorial director of Parabola, an acclaimed quarterly magazine that seeks to bring timeless spiritual wisdom to the burning questions of the day. Her writings, podcasts, and other details can be found on her website and on parabola.org.

 

This program is presented in partnership with Sharon Salzberg and teachers from the New York Insight Meditation Center, the Interdependence Project, and Parabola Magazine and supported by the Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism.

the Interdependence Project
  • Mindfulness Meditation

For centuries Himalayan practitioners have used meditation to quiet the mind, open the heart, calm the nervous system, and increase focus. Mindfulness meditation offers a refuge from the world and an opportunity to engage more consciously.

Whether you’re a beginner, a dabbler, or a skilled meditator seeking the company of others, join expert teachers in a 45-minute weekly program. Each session is inspired by a different work of art from the Rubin Museum’s collection. Designed to fit into your lunch break, the program includes an opening talk, a 20-minute sitting session, and a closing discussion. Chairs will be provided.

This week’s in-person meditation session will be led by Elaine Retholtz, and the theme for this month is Balance.

 

About the Teacher

Elaine Retholtz Headshot

Elaine Retholtz has been studying and practicing the Dharma since 1988. In addition to teaching Dharma at New York Insight, she is a certified Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) teacher and a certified MBSR teacher trainer. She is deeply interested in helping students integrate mindfulness into daily life. Elaine is committed to deepening her own understanding of issues of diversity and the way racial conditioning in the United States affects all of us—both as individuals and in relation to the institutions we are a part of, including New York Insight. She’s been involved in New York Insight’s diversity efforts for many years.

 

This program is presented in partnership with Sharon Salzberg and teachers from the New York Insight Meditation Center, the Interdependence Project, and Parabola Magazine and supported by the Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism.

the Interdependence Project
  • Asia Week Reception

Join us as we celebrate the opening of the Rubin’s 20th anniversary exhibition, Reimagine: Himalayan Art Now. The event includes an exhibition preview, a performance as part of contributing artist Sonam Dolma Brauen’s Field of Wishes installation, and delicious cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, and conversation.

Reimagine: Himalayan Art Now invites visitors to contemplate and celebrate what Himalayan art means now with a Museum-wide exhibition of artworks by over 30 contemporary artists, many from the Himalayan region and diaspora. The exhibition  transforms the entire Museum with new commissions and existing works juxtaposed with objects from the Museum’s collection, inviting new ways of encountering traditional Himalayan art.

You may have seen that the Rubin is changing. To learn more about our vision of bringing Himalayan art and its insights to people where they are, please read the letter from our director, Jorrit Britschgi.

Our generous supporters:

Reimagine: Himalayan Art Now and the Rubin Museum’s Asia Week Reception are supported by Bob and Lois Baylis, Noah P. Dorsky, Jacques and Natasha Gelman Foundation, Dan Gimbel of NEPC, LLC, Agnes Gund, New York Life, Matt and Ann Nimetz, The Prospect Hill Foundation, Eileen Caulfield Schwab, and Taipei Cultural Center in New York.

Reimagine: Himalayan Art Now is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

Reimagine: Himalayan Art Now is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Fundraising for Reimagine: Himalayan Art Now is underway and the supporter list is in formation.

 

BECOME A SPONSOR TO SUPPORT REIMAGINE: HIMALAYAN ART NOW

By sponsoring our Asia Week Reception and supporting Reimagine: Himalayan Art Now, you will enable thousands of visitors to experience the work of contemporary artists and the Rubin’s traditional Himalayan art collection through a contemporary lens. 

Chair Sponsorship, $10,000

Co-Chair Sponsorship, $5,000

Host Committee Sponsorship, $5,000 payable over two years

Please contact Dana Boll, dboll@rubinmuseum.org for more information.

 

 

Image Credits
Shushank Shrestha (b. 1993, Kathmandu, Nepal); Male Guardian Lion Dog (one of a pair from Two Guardian Lion Dogs); 2023; ceramic, in glaze lustre; 52 × 27 × 44 in.; photo courtesy of Shuhank Shrestha, Massachusetts, USA.
  • Members Tour

Explore notions of death and the afterlife through the art of Tibetan Buddhism and Christianity in an exclusive docent-led tour and “Last Look” of the exhibition Death Is Not the End.

The exhibition features prints, oil paintings, bone ornaments, thangka paintings, sculptures, illuminated manuscripts, and ritual items, and brings together 58 objects spanning 12 centuries from the Rubin Museum’s collection alongside artworks on loan from private collections and major institutions. The exhibition is organized around three major themes: the Human Condition, or the shared understanding of our mortality in this world; States In-Between, or the concepts of limbo, purgatory, and bardo; and (After)life, focusing on resurrection, ideas of transformation, and heaven.

The tour will meet at the base of the spiral staircase.

Registration is required to attend. To register and for any questions, please email us at membership@rubinmuseum.org

Not yet a member? Visit our membership page to learn about the benefits of becoming a Rubin member.

 

Death Is Not the End is supported by the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, Ellen Bayard Weedon Foundation, Robert Lehman Foundation, and The Prospect Hill Foundation.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

This project is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

  • K2 Friday Night

Cocktails, art, and music make a heady mix during K2 Friday Nights, where admission is free every Friday from 6:00 to 10:00 PM. Café Serai becomes the K2 Lounge, offering a special drink menu to accompany the evening’s DJ, Snkr Joe. Explore all the galleries, dive deeper with an exhibition tour at 7:15 PM, and kick off your weekend with the Rubin. 

Coming with friends? Learn about group reservations and read more about K2 Friday Nights and the other programs offered at the Rubin on Friday nights.

 

About the DJ

Snkr Joe is well known for his contributions as a pioneer in the online sneaker community and as a founder of one of the best all-vinyl, all-45 party Mobile Mondays. His passion for DJing dates back to 1992 when he studied the art of mixing records. What started out as a hobby is now a full-time profession as an open format DJ playing at New York City’s hottest speakeasies, hotels, lounges, restaurants, and bars, such as Nothing Really Matters, Not A Speakeasy, The UES (Ice Cream Shoppe Speakeasy), The Backroom, Mr. Purple (Indigo Hotel), Nina’s x Liquid Lab (Nomo Soho Hotel), and Buddha-Bar and Restaurant.

“Setting the vibe for a room that makes people smile, dance, and laugh is rewarding to me. All of these reactions tell me that I have done my job.”

 

Lead support for the Rubin Museum is provided by the Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation, Bob and Lois Baylis, Barbara Bowman, E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, Noah P. Dorsky, Fred Eychaner, Christopher J. Fussner, Agnes Gund, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Global, Henry Luce Foundation, The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation, Mellon Foundation, Matt and Ann Nimetz, Rasika and Girish Reddy, Shelley and Donald Rubin, Tiger Baron Foundation, and Ellen Bayard Weedon Foundation.

General operating support of the Rubin Museum of Art is provided by Daphne Hoch Cunningham and John Cunningham, Anne E. Delaney, Dalio Philanthropies, the Estate of Lisina M. Hoch, Andres Mata, Dan Gimbel of NEPC, Inc., The Prospect Hill Foundation, Basha Rubin and Scott Grinsell, Linda Schejola, Eileen Caulfield Schwab, Tong-Tong Zhu and Jianing Liu, with generous donations from the Museum’s Board of Trustees, individual donors and members, and corporate and foundation supporters.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochcul and the New York State Legislature.

the pierre and tana matisse foundation Prospect Hill Foundation
  • Mindfulness Meditation

For centuries Himalayan practitioners have used meditation to quiet the mind, open the heart, calm the nervous system, and increase focus. Mindfulness meditation offers a refuge from the world and an opportunity to engage more consciously.

Whether you’re a beginner, a dabbler, or a skilled meditator seeking the company of others, join expert teachers in a 45-minute weekly in-person program, each inspired by a different work of art from the Rubin Museum’s collection. The program includes an opening talk, a 20-minute sitting session, and a closing discussion. Chairs will be provided.

This week’s in-person meditation session will be led by Kimberly Brown, and the theme for this month is New Beginnings.

This program is presented in partnership with Sharon Salzberg and teachers from the New York Insight Meditation Center, the Interdependence Project, and Parabola Magazine and supported by the Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism.

the Interdependence Project

 

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

KIMBERLY BROWN

Kimberly Brown is a meditation teacher and author. She leads classes and retreats that emphasize the power of compassion and kindness meditation to reconnect us to ourselves and others. Her teachings provide an approachable pathway to personal and collective well-being through effective and modern techniques based on traditional practices. She studies in both the Tibetan and Insight schools of Buddhism and is a certified mindfulness instructor. Her new book, Navigating Grief and Loss: 25 Buddhist Practices to Keep Your Heart Open to Yourself and Others, was published in November 2022, and an updated edition of Steady, Calm, and Brave was released in January 2023. Both are published by Prometheus Books. You can learn more about Kimberly on her website.

  • Mindfulness Meditation

For centuries Himalayan practitioners have used meditation to quiet the mind, open the heart, calm the nervous system, and increase focus. Mindfulness meditation offers a refuge from the world and an opportunity to engage more consciously.

Whether you’re a beginner, a dabbler, or a skilled meditator seeking the company of others, join expert teachers in a 45-minute weekly in-person program. Each session is inspired by a different work of art from the Rubin Museum’s collection. Designed to fit into your lunch break, the program includes an opening talk, a 20-minute sitting session, and a closing discussion. Chairs will be provided.

This week’s in-person meditation session will be led by Lama Aria Drolma, and the theme for this month isCompassion.

This program is presented in partnership with Sharon Salzberg, the Interdependence Project, and Parabola Magazine and supported by the Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism.

the Interdependence Project

About the Speaker

Lama Aria Drolma

Lama Aria Drolma is an ordained Buddhist teacher in the Karma Kagyu tradition of Tibetan Buddhism, who has completed over a decade of monastic study and meditation training. She is a graduate of the traditional Tibetan Buddhist retreat program spanning three years and three months, an advanced cloistered meditation training program at Palpung Thubten Choling Monastery, New York.

Lama Aria Drolma teaches worldwide, leading retreats, workshops, and corporate meditation programs and is a popular guest speaker at universities and organizations. She emphasizes Vajrayana Buddhism and Buddhist principles, making them relevant in our everyday lives, helping us to cultivate loving kindness and compassion, and bringing about a transformation of contentment and a genuine sense of well-being.

  • Members Tea and Tour

Join Rubin members and staff for a complimentary group tea in the Café on Saturday, June 3, at 2:15 PM, followed by an exclusive member tour of Death Is Not the End at 3:15 PM.

Death Is Not the End explores notions of death and afterlife through the art of Tibetan Buddhism and Christianity. The exhibition features prints, oil paintings, bone ornaments, thangka paintings, sculptures, illuminated manuscripts, and ritual items, and brings together 58 objects spanning 12 centuries from the Rubin Museum’s collection alongside artworks on loan from private collections and major institutions. The exhibition is organized around three major themes: the Human Condition, or the shared understanding of our mortality in this world; States In-Between, or the concepts of limbo, purgatory, and bardo; and (After)life, focusing on resurrection, ideas of transformation, and heaven.

The tour will meet in the lobby at 3:15 PM.

Registration is required to attend. To register and for any questions, please email us at membership@rubinmuseum.org.

Not yet a member? Visit our membership page to learn about the benefits of becoming a Rubin member.

Death Is Not the End is supported by the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, Ellen Bayard Weedon Foundation, Robert Lehman Foundation, and The Prospect Hill Foundation.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochcul and the New York State Legislature.

This project is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

  • Above and Below

Pre-screening tour of the galleries: 2:45″“3:15 PM

Screening and talkback in the theater: 3:30″“4:50 PM

Join us for the the NYC Premiere of the new short film Above and Below, directed and produced by Sheri Brenner, which follows the 19-year rise of artist Tsherin Sherpa. Trained in the art of Tibetan Buddhist thangka painting, Tsherin comes from Kathmandu to San Francisco as a devout religious painter, and struggles to reinvent himself in a new land. In doing so, he finds new meaning for an ancient art form and skyrockets his career to global art stardom.

Throughout the 34-minute film, attendees will recognize artworks by Tsherin Sherpa which have been featured in Rubin Museum exhibitions spanning over a decade, from the 2010 group exhibition Tradition Transformed to solo artworks such as Wish-Fulfilling Tree, crafted in collaboration with local Nepalese metal artists and craftsmen in response to the devastating 2015 Ghorka earthquake in Nepal.

Following the film screening, there will be a talkback and audience Q&A with Rubin Museum Executive Director Jorrit Britschgi and director Sheri Brenner on stage, who will be joined virtually by Tsherin Sherpa.

About the artists

Tsherin Sherpa

Tsherin Sherpa was born in Kathmandu, Nepal, in 1968, and currently lives and works between California and Nepal. From the age of 13, he was trained in traditional Tibetan thangka painting by his father, Master Urgen Dorje. In 1998 Sherpa immigrated to California, where he taught traditional thangka painting until he began to explore his own style, drawing on the visual vocabulary of thangka painting to create artworks that incorporate Buddhist iconography and pop-culture references. His works offer an interplay and juxtaposition between sacred/secular, traditional/contemporary, and settlement/movement. Sherpa’s practice stems from his personal experiences within the Himalayan diaspora, as well as the nomadic history of Himalayan peoples. Sherpa has participated in numerous exhibitions in Asia, Europe, and the US, including representing Nepal for its inaugural participation at the Venice Biennale in 2022. His works are in the major museum collections. In February 2022 the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts presented his first museum, mid-career retrospective. In 2022, Tsherin Sherpa joined the Rubin Museum’s Board of Trustees.

Sheri Brenner

Sheri Brenner has produced and directed numerous documentaries on world culture, spiritual philosophy, sacred art, science, and technology. Her credits include the national PBS broadcast of Sandpainting: Sacred Art of Tibet, and In Beauty I Walk. Her life’s work is devoted to revealing and sharing the traditions, beliefs, and spiritual philosophies that lift up and strengthen all humanity. She holds an MFA degree in cinema from San Francisco State University, and was the recipient of a Haas Foundation Grant and a Columbia Foundation Grant. She currently serves as Adjunct Faculty and Media Lab Director in the Media Studies Program at the University of San Francisco.

Her film Above and Below is the outcome of a lifelong love of Buddhist art and philosophy. Her upcoming film, Images of Enlightenment was originally conceived as a companion piece to Above and Below. It tells the story of Tsherin’s father, Urgen Dorje Sherpa, and his contributions to the art of thangka painting.

  • Art Therapy Workshop for Members

Rubin Museum members are invited to join Ikuko Acosta, Director of the New York University Art Therapy Program, for an evening of self-healing and creativity.

In this online art therapy workshop, participants will use a drawing exercise inspired by the current exhibition, Healing Practices: Stories from Himalayan Americans, to gain insights into themselves through creating, sharing, and processing their artwork. Attendees will also leave with a basic understanding of the field of art therapy.

An artistic background and/or skills are not required to participate in this event.

Ikuko Acosta, PhD, ATR-BC, LCAT.

Ikuko has been involved in the field of art therapy for the past 37 years as an art therapist and art theory educator. Her clinical expertise is with the adult psychiatric population.

Ikuko has been active in promoting cross-cultural application of art therapy worldwide, and has been presenting and teaching in more than 20 countries over the past 25 years.

Ikuko’s most recent funded research is a collaboration with the Parkinson’s Unit at Langone Medical Center focused on the impact of creative experience on the people with Parkinson’s disease.

Major support for Healing Practices: Stories from Himalayan Americans is provided by The Prospect Hill Foundation as well as by generous donations from the Museum’s Board of Trustees, individual donors, and members.

Public support of the Rubin Museum of Art is provided by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of the Governor and the New York State Legislature.

Prospect Hill Foundation
  • Members Yoga Series

Join us for Part 2 of our Virtual Yoga Series, on Tuesday, December 14. Pick a quiet, comfortable place in your home and join yoga instructor Dina Ivas who will lead an invigorating, accessible, and art-focused practice.

We will spotlight a piece of art that is currently on display in Awaken: A Tibetan Buddhist Journey Toward Enlightenment. This exhibition teaches us how powerful artworks, such as sculptures, hanging scroll paintings, illuminated manuscript pages, and ritual items, help practitioners develop awareness and recognize that everything is interconnected.

We hope you can join us for this yoga and art experience!

Dina Ivas is a long-time fan of the Rubin Museum of Art. She is delighted to draw from the art and wisdom of the Himalayan region and incorporate this into her yoga class for Rubin members. She has been a successful full-time yoga teacher since leaving a corporate career in fashion marketing/merchandising in 2010. For over a decade she has led classes in New York City’s top gyms and yoga studios and organized yoga retreats worldwide. When not on the mat, Dina loves to write, cook, and organize beach clean-ups.

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