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  • Laurie Anderson: About Time

Time is one of the most impermanent forms of measurement that humans have devised to help manage life. Do you feel like you’re running out of time? Which way is time going? Are you able to stop time? If so, how? In a series of on-stage conversations, artist, writer, and vocalist Laurie Anderson tackles these questions and more to help us reframe the concept of time and perhaps our perspective on life. 

Laurie has invited a group of her favorite writers, thinkers, and poets to assist us in picturing new and different views of time.

In this final conversation, Laurie is joined by fiction novelist Benjamín Labatut. 

Arrive early to visit Laurie Anderson’s scent and video piece “Uncle Allen” in the Mandala Lab on the third floor. Then, meet at the base of the spiral staircase at 5:15 PM for a docent-led tour. All ticket buyers receive free admission to the galleries.

Other About Time guests include poet Jane Hirshfield (Friday, February 9), writer Tom McCarthy (Friday, February 23), Buddhist philosopher and teacher the Venerable Tenzin Priyadarshi (Sunday, March 24).

This program, originally scheduled for Saturday, March 30, has moved to Sunday, March 31.

 

About the Speakers

Laurie Anderson Headshot

Laurie Anderson is one of America’s most renowned and daring creative pioneers. She is best known for her multimedia presentations and innovative use of technology. As writer, director, visual artist, and vocalist she has created groundbreaking works that span the worlds of art, theater, and experimental music. Anderson has published seven books, and her visual work has been presented in major museums around the world. In 2002 Anderson was appointed the first artist-in-residence of NASA, which culminated in her 2004 touring solo performance The End of the Moon. Her film Heart of a Dog was chosen as an official selection of the 2015 Venice and Toronto Film Festivals and received a special screening at the Rubin Museum, where Laurie joined in conversation with Darren Aronofsky. 

Laurie has made many appearances at the Rubin, and has been in conversation with Wim Wenders, Mark Morris, Janna Levin, Gavin Schmidt, Neil Gaiman, and Tiokasin Ghosthorse. She also hosted the premiere season of the Rubin’s AWAKEN podcast.

 

Benjamín Labatut Haadshot

Benjamín Labatut is a Chilean fiction writer whose English-language debut When We Cease to Understand the World sought to understand the minds of physicists and mathematicians. His latest work of fiction, The MANIAC, centers on John von Neumann whose discoveries laid the groundwork for computer science and nuclear weapons. This is his first appearance at the Rubin.

 

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

 

Image credit: Stephanie Diani, 2023
  • Laurie Anderson: About Time

Time is one of the most impermanent forms of measurement that humans have devised to help manage life. Do you feel like you’re running out of time? Which way is time going? Are you able to stop time? If so, how? In a series of on-stage conversations, artist, writer, and vocalist Laurie Anderson tackles these questions and more to help us reframe the concept of time and perhaps our perspective on life. 

Laurie has invited a group of her favorite writers, thinkers, and poets to assist us in picturing new and different views of time.

In this third conversation, Laurie is joined by Buddhist philosopher and teacher the Venerable Tenzin Priyadarshi, who serves as the president and CEO of The Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Arrive early to visit Laurie Anderson’s scent and video piece “Uncle Allen” in the Mandala Lab on the third floor. Then, meet at the base of the spiral staircase at 5:15 PM for a docent-led tour. All ticket buyers receive free admission to the galleries.

Other About Time guests include poet Jane Hirshfield (Friday, February 9), writer Tom McCarthy (Friday, February 23), and fiction novelist Benjamín Labatut (Sunday, March 31).

 

About the Speakers

Laurie Anderson Headshot

Laurie Anderson is one of America’s most renowned and daring creative pioneers. She is best known for her multimedia presentations and innovative use of technology. As writer, director, visual artist, and vocalist she has created groundbreaking works that span the worlds of art, theater, and experimental music. Anderson has published seven books, and her visual work has been presented in major museums around the world. In 2002 Anderson was appointed the first artist-in-residence of NASA, which culminated in her 2004 touring solo performance The End of the Moon. Her film Heart of a Dog was chosen as an official selection of the 2015 Venice and Toronto Film Festivals and received a special screening at the Rubin Museum, where Laurie joined in conversation with Darren Aronofsky. 

Laurie has made many appearances at the Rubin, and has been in conversation with Wim Wenders, Mark Morris, Janna Levin, Gavin Schmidt, Neil Gaiman, and Tiokasin Ghosthorse. She also hosted the premiere season of the Rubin’s AWAKEN podcast.

 

Venerable Tenzin Priyadarshi Headshot

Venerable Tenzin Priyadarshi is president and CEO of The Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a center dedicated to inquiry, dialogue, and education on the ethical and humane dimensions of life. The Center is a collaborative and nonpartisan think-and-do tank, and its programs emphasize responsibility and examine meaningfulness and moral purpose between individuals, organizations, and societies. Six Nobel Peace Prize laureates serve as The Center’s founding members and its programs run in several countries and are expanding.

Venerable Tenzin’s unusual background encompasses entering a Buddhist monastery at the age of 10 and receiving graduate education at Harvard University with degrees ranging from philosophy to physics to international relations. He is a Tribeca Disruptive Fellow and a 2018 Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. His book Running Toward Mystery—The Adventure of an Unconventional Life was published by Random House US.

Venerable Tenzin serves on the boards of a number of academic, humanitarian, and religious organizations. He is the recipient of several recognitions and awards, and received Harvard’s Distinguished Alumni Honors for his visionary contributions to humanity. 

Venerable Tenzin first appeared on the Rubin stage with artist Antony Gormley in 2010, and contributed a week-long teaching in 2020 as part of The Rubin Daily Offering series on how to navigate  the unprecedented during the COVID lockdown.

 

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

 

Image credit: Stephanie Diani, 2023
  • Laurie Anderson: About Time

Time is one of the most impermanent forms of measurement that humans have devised to help manage life. Do you feel like you’re running out of time? Which way is time going? Are you able to stop time? If so, how? In a series of on-stage conversations, artist, writer, and vocalist Laurie Anderson tackles these questions and more to help us reframe the concept of time and perhaps our perspective on life. 

Laurie has invited a group of her favorite writers, thinkers, and poets to assist us in picturing new and different views of time.

In this second conversation, Laurie is joined by novelist Tom McCarthy, whose work has been translated into more than 20 languages and adapted for cinema, theater, and radio.

Arrive early to visit Laurie Anderson’s scent and video piece “Uncle Allen” in the Mandala Lab on the third floor. Then, meet at the base of the spiral staircase at 6:15 PM for a docent-led tour. All ticket buyers receive free admission to the galleries.

Other About Time guests include poet Jane Hirshfield (Friday, February 9), Buddhist philosopher and teacher the Venerable Tenzin Priyadarshi (Sunday, March 24), and fiction novelist Benjamín Labatut (Sunday, March 31).

 

About the Speakers

Laurie Anderson Headshot

Laurie Anderson is one of America’s most renowned and daring creative pioneers. She is best known for her multimedia presentations and innovative use of technology. As writer, director, visual artist, and vocalist she has created groundbreaking works that span the worlds of art, theater, and experimental music. Anderson has published seven books, and her visual work has been presented in major museums around the world. In 2002 Anderson was appointed the first artist-in-residence of NASA, which culminated in her 2004 touring solo performance The End of the Moon. Her film Heart of a Dog was chosen as an official selection of the 2015 Venice and Toronto Film Festivals and received a special screening at the Rubin Museum, where Laurie joined in conversation with Darren Aronofsky. 

Laurie has made many appearances at the Rubin, and has been in conversation with Wim Wenders, Mark Morris, Janna Levin, Gavin Schmidt, Neil Gaiman, and Tiokasin Ghosthorse. She also hosted the premiere season of the Rubin’s AWAKEN podcast.

 

Tom McCarthy Headshot

Tom McCarthy is a novelist whose books are often structured around repetition, recess and delay, and reject linear models of time in order to explore the looping, jarring, out-of-sync temporalities that color late modernity. 

His first novel, Remainder, published in 2005 and recipient of the 2008 Believer Book Award, sees the victim of an unspecified technological disaster use his compensation funds to stage elaborate re-enactments of half-remembered scenes from his own past. His fourth novel, Satin Island, a 2015 Booker Prize finalist, presents a corporate anthropologist, overwhelmed by his inability to grasp, let alone sum up, his own epoch (or even to understand what ‘epoch’ might mean in an age of data-saturation in which all eras are available on replay), repeatedly fixate on the digital buffering symbol at which he spends much of his time staring, finding in it the ultimate icon for contemporary experience. 

His latest, The Making of Incarnation, published in 2021, is an unpacking of the history of time-and-motion study. In 2013 he was awarded the inaugural Windham-Campbell Prize for Fiction. Born in Scotland, he is now a Swedish citizen, and lives in Berlin. This is his first appearance at the Rubin.

 

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

 

Image credit: Stephanie Diani, 2023
  • Laurie Anderson: About Time

Time is one of the most impermanent forms of measurement that humans have devised to help manage life. Do you feel like you’re running out of time? Which way is time going? Are you able to stop time? If so, how? In a series of on-stage conversations, artist, writer, and vocalist Laurie Anderson tackles these questions and more to help us reframe the concept of time and perhaps our perspective on life. 

Laurie has invited a group of her favorite writers, thinkers, and poets to assist us in picturing new and different views of time. 

In this first conversation, Laurie is joined by poet Jane Hirshfield, who is known as one of American poetry’s central spokespersons for the biosphere. 

Arrive early to visit Laurie Anderson’s scent and video piece “Uncle Allen” in the Mandala Lab on the third floor. Then, meet at the base of the spiral staircase at 6:15 PM for a docent-led tour. All ticket buyers receive free admission to the galleries.

Other About Time guests include writer Tom McCarthy (Friday, February 23), Buddhist philosopher and teacher the Venerable Tenzin Priyadarshi (Sunday, March 24), and fiction novelist Benjamín Labatut (Sunday, March 31).

 

About the Speakers

Laurie Anderson Headshot

Laurie Anderson is one of America’s most renowned and daring creative pioneers. She is best known for her multimedia presentations and innovative use of technology. As writer, director, visual artist, and vocalist she has created groundbreaking works that span the worlds of art, theater, and experimental music. Anderson has published seven books, and her visual work has been presented in major museums around the world. In 2002 Anderson was appointed the first artist-in-residence of NASA, which culminated in her 2004 touring solo performance The End of the Moon. Her film Heart of a Dog was chosen as an official selection of the 2015 Venice and Toronto Film Festivals and received a special screening at the Rubin Museum, where Laurie was joined in conversation with Darren Aronofsky.

Laurie has made many appearances at the Rubin, and has been in conversation with Wim Wenders, Mark Morris, Janna Levin, Gavin Schmidt, Neil Gaiman, and Tiokasin Ghosthorse. She also hosted the premiere season of the Rubin’s AWAKEN podcast.

 

Jane Hirshfield Headshot

Jane Hirshfield is writing “some of the most important poetry in the world today” (The New York Times Magazine). Her most recent book is The Asking: New & Selected Poems (Knopf, 2023). She is also the author of two now-classic collections of essays, and the editor and co-translator of four books presenting world poets from the deep past. 

Hirshfield’s work appears in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New York Review of Books, The Times Literary Supplement, and 10 editions of The Best American Poetry.

A lay-ordained practitioner of Soto Zen and former chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, she was elected into the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 2019. This is her first appearance on the Rubin stage.

 

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

 

Image credit: Stephanie Diani, 2023
  • LIFE AFTER… WITH AMANDA PALMER

Songwriter and author Amanda Palmer curates and hosts three exchanges around what happens when significant, and sometimes unexpected, life events lead to opportunities for personal transformation. Life after… COVIDafter… wellnessafter… telling the truth on yourself will constitute some of the topics explored on Friday evenings in November with her guests: artist Gonkar Gyatso (November 3), eco-writer Sophie Strand (November 10), and activist Noor Tagouri (November 17).

Who are we after we experience a catastrophic life event? Who are we after we fall in and out of love? Who are we after we change jobs? Who are we after we almost die, but make it out alive? Amanda and each of her guests are not afraid of these big questions. In Amanda’s words, “Perhaps we’ll find some answers, but more likely, we’ll all feel less alone and make one another laugh.”

In this second conversation, Amanda speaks with eco-writer Sophie Strand about Life After… Wellness.

Join us before the event at 6:15 PM for a docent-led exhibition tour of Death Is Not the End.

 

About the Speakers

Sophie Strand is a writer based in the Hudson Valley who focuses on the intersection of spirituality, storytelling, and ecology. She is the author of The Flowering Wand, The Madonna Secret, and a forthcoming memoir on disability and ecology, The Body is a Doorway. Subscribe for her newsletter at sophiestrand.substack.com. And follow her work on Instagram @cosmogyny and at www.sophiestrand.com.

 

Headshot of Amanda Palmer

Amanda Palmer is a best-selling author, feminist, songwriter, community leader, pianist, and ukulele-enthusiast who simultaneously embraces and explodes traditional frameworks of music, theater, and art. She first came to prominence as part of the punk cabaret duo The Dresden Dolls, earning global applause for their inventive songcraft and wide-ranging theatricality. Her solo career featured such groundbreaking works as the crowd-funded Theatre Is Evil, which made a top 10 debut on the Billboard 200 in 2012 and remains the top-funded original music project on Kickstarter. In 2013, she presented “The Art of Asking” at the annual TED conference, which has been viewed over 20 million times worldwide. Palmer expanded her philosophy into the New York Times best-selling memoir, The Art of Asking: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Let People HelpSince 2015, Palmer has used the patronage platform Patreon to fund her artwork with an average of 15,000 patrons micro-supporting her creations each month. In 2019, Palmer released her solo album, There Will Be No Intermission. Her first appearance at the Rubin was with neuroscientist David Eagleman on the subject of Finding Time. She can also be heard on Season 1 of the Rubin’s AWAKEN podcast.

 

Death Is Not the End is supported by the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, Ellen Bayard Weedon Foundation, Robert Lehman Foundation, and The Prospect Hill Foundation.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

Death Is Not the End is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

  • LIFE AFTER… WITH AMANDA PALMER

Songwriter and author Amanda Palmer curates and hosts three exchanges around what happens when significant, and sometimes unexpected, life events lead to opportunities for personal transformation. Life after… COVIDafter… wellnessafter… telling the truth on yourself will constitute some of the topics explored on Friday evenings in November with her guests: artist Gonkar Gyatso (November 3), eco-writer Sophie Strand (November 10), and activist Noor Tagouri (November 17).Who are we after we experience a catastrophic life event? Who are we after we fall in and out of love? Who are we after we change jobs? Who are we after we almost die, but make it out alive? Amanda and each of her guests are not afraid of these big questions. In Amanda’s words, “Perhaps we’ll find some answers, but more likely, we’ll all feel less alone and make one another laugh.”

In this final conversation, Amanda speaks with activist Noor Tagouri about Life After… Telling The Truth on Yourself.

Join us before the event at 6:15 PM for a docent-led exhibition tour of Death Is Not the End.

 

About the Speakers

Headshot of Noor Tagouri

Noor Tagouri is a formidable force in the world of journalism and storytelling. Her groundbreaking 2018 documentary, Sold In America, delved deep into the complexities of the US sex trade, earning her a prestigious Gracie Award for Best Investigative Series.

In 2022, Noor launched the Webby-nominated investigative series REP: A Story About the Stories We Tell, which explores the concepts of representation and objectivity in media. With a finger on the pulse of her communities’ concerns, Noor Tagouri continues to transform media, making it more inclusive, representative, and soulful than ever before.

 

Headshot of Amanda Palmer

Amanda Palmer is a best-selling author, feminist, songwriter, community leader, pianist, and ukulele-enthusiast who simultaneously embraces and explodes traditional frameworks of music, theater, and art. She first came to prominence as part of the punk cabaret duo The Dresden Dolls, earning global applause for their inventive songcraft and wide-ranging theatricality. Her solo career featured such groundbreaking works as the crowd-funded Theatre Is Evil, which made a top 10 debut on the Billboard 200 in 2012 and remains the top-funded original music project on Kickstarter. In 2013, she presented “The Art of Asking” at the annual TED conference, which has been viewed over 20 million times worldwide. Palmer expanded her philosophy into the New York Times best-selling memoir, The Art of Asking: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Let People HelpSince 2015, Palmer has used the patronage platform Patreon to fund her artwork with an average of 15,000 patrons micro-supporting her creations each month. In 2019, Palmer released her solo album, There Will Be No Intermission. Her first appearance at the Rubin was with neuroscientist David Eagleman on the subject of Finding Time. She can also be heard on Season 1 of the Rubin’s AWAKEN podcast.

 

Death Is Not the End is supported by the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, Ellen Bayard Weedon Foundation, Robert Lehman Foundation, and The Prospect Hill Foundation.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

Death Is Not the End is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

  • Celebrating Buddha’s Life: Saga Dawa

Saga Dawa, the holiest month in the Tibetan Buddhist calendar, celebrates Shakyamuni Buddha’s birth, enlightenment, and maha parinirvana, or passing away. The merit of any good deeds performed during this month are said to be multiplied many times over—by as many as a hundred million times. Buddhist rituals and depictions of the afterlife can be further explored on the sixth floor Death is Not the End exhibition.

In collaboration with New York Spirituality Week, join the Venerable Tulku Namgyal Dawa Rinpoche, a senior Tibetan Buddhist teacher and meditation master, and Tashi Chödrön, Rubin Museum Himalayan Programs and Communities Ambassador, to learn more about Saga Dawa. Tulku Namgyal Dawa Rinpoche will also provide a guided meditation and answer questions in a post-program Q&A.

Prior to the program, join a 2:15 PM gallery tour that explores imagery of the Buddha in the Rubin’s collection with Senior Curator Elena Pakhoutouva.

This program is hosted by Tashi Chödrön, Rubin Museum Himalayan Programs and Communities Ambassador.

Spirituality Week is a community produced, city-wide festival to nourish the spiritual needs of New Yorkers and its visitors. The festival contains hundreds of events hosted by everyone from emerging practitioners to major spiritual centers. Thousands will experience a deeper sense of belonging, spiritual connection, holistic practices, boundless possibilities, and breakthrough moments to support all aspects of life. Spirituality Week and its partners will offer an eclectic array of immersive experiences focused on spiritual exploration through workshops, individual sessions, luminary keynotes, celebratory performances, and intimate dinners on a free and paid basis.

About the Speakers:

Tulku Namgyal Rinpoche (b. 1974) is a son of Shenphen Dawa Rinpoche. He has been recognized as a reincarnation of Garwang Sangye Dorje who was one of the main teachers of Dudjom Rinpoche. His mother is H.R.H. Ashi Pema Codon Wangchuk, a royal family member of Bhutan.Tulku Namgyal Rinpoche was enthroned by Dudjom Rinpoche himself, who blessed him and predicted his future. He received his education at St. Paul Catholic school in Darjeeling, for his higher school he attended Baha School, in Maharashtra. Later he studied at Penor Rinpoche’s Namdroling Monastery and later in a Nyingma monastery in Kathmandu for further training in the Dharma. Tulku Namgyal Rinpoche currently teaches at Dudjom Tersar Yeshe Nyingpo Temple in Manhattan.

Major support for Himalayan Heritage is provided by The Frederick P. Lenz Foundation for American Buddhism.

Public support of the Rubin Museum of Art is provided by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of the Governor and the New York State Legislature.

Image credits
Left: Major Events of Buddha’s Life; Northeastern India; 12th century; “Andagu” stone with pigments; Rubin Museum of Art; C2005.4.2 (HAR 65388)
Right: Machik Labdron (1055-1153); Kham Province, Eastern Tibet; 19th century; pigments on cloth; Rubin Museum of Art, gift of Shelley and Donald Rubin; C2006.66.563 (HAR 1045)
  • Your Brain on Art

Our brains and bodies transform when we participate in the arts. In their new book Your Brain on Art, authors Susan Magsamen and Ivy Ross guide us on a life-altering journey through the science of neuroaesthetics and share how the arts can improve our health, enable us to flourish, and build stronger communities.

Moderated by The Slowdown‘s Editor-in-Chief Spencer Bailey.

Your Brain on Art, which refers to the Rubin’s Mandala Lab in its pages, also features conversations with artists such as David Byrne, Renée Fleming, and evolutionary biologist E. O. Wilson. The book is on sale at the Museum’s Shop for $30 (Rubin member price:$22.50)

“Susan Magsamen and Ivy Ross, through extensive interviews and research, have created something beautiful and affirming with their book. Its pages provide proof for what so many of us have always known, that art, especially art in community, is transformative beyond measure.”—David Byrne, founding member of Talking Heads and author of How Music Works

The event will be followed by a book signing with the authors and a tour of the Mandala Lab with the Rubin Museum’s Tim McHenry.

About the Authors

Susan Magsamen is the founder and director of the International Arts + Mind Lab, Center for Applied Neuroaesthetics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where she is a faculty member. She is also the co-director of the NeuroArts Blueprint. Susan works with both the public and private sectors using arts and culture evidence-based approaches in areas including health, child development, education, workforce innovation, rehabilitation, and social equity.


Ivy Ross is the Vice President of Design for hardware product area at Google, where she leads a team that has won over 225 design awards. She is a National Endowment for Arts grant recipient and was ninth on Fast Company‘s list of the one hundred Most Creative People in Business in 2019. Ross believes that the intersection of arts and sciences is where the most engaging and creative ideas are found.

Spencer Bailey is the co-founder and editor-in-chief of the media company The Slowdown and host of the Time Sensitive and At a Distance podcasts. He is also editor-at-large of the book publisher Phaidon and a contributing editor at Town & Country. His latest book is Alchemy: The Material World of David Adjaye to be published by Phaidon, July this year.

  • Attachment

How do our cravings overcome us in times of estrangement? How do we come to terms with these feelings of attachment and our desires for the outcomes that “could have been”? Michael R. Jackson, (the living, breathing composer of a Pulitzer-prize and Tony-award winning musical) does not shy away from these difficult internal conversations in his hit stage creation A Strange Loop. Centered around “a gay black man writing a musical about a gay black man writing a musical,” Jackson’s semi-autobiographical character, Usher, is surrounded by cravings relating to his sexuality, body image, family relationships, and identity as an aspiring musical artist and composer.

Michael R. Jackson will unpack these vulnerable thoughts with scientist Dr. Hedy Kober, an associate professor of Psychology at Yale University whose studies specialize in cravings much like those which (de)motivate Usher in A Strange Loop. Ticket holders have the opportunity to join author and performer Kevin Townley for a gallery tour prior to the theater program at 6:00 PM or directly following the program at 8:30 PM. Tours are 35 minutes and will explore the permanent collection and the interactive Mandala Lab installation which inspired the Brainwave: Emotion talk series. The program will examine how both sacred and secular art can help us to unlock the wild wisdom of human emotion.

Please note that this event may be filmed or recorded.

About the speakers

Michael R. Jackson

Michael R. Jackson is one of Time‘s 100 most influential people of 2022. A Strange Loop (Playwrights Horizons 2019 world premiere in association with Page 73 Productions) won Tony Awards for Best Book and Best Musical, the Pulitzer Prize and New York Drama Critics Circle award. The New York Times called it a “laparoscopy of the heart, soul, and loins”¦ [a] gutsy, jubilantly anguished musical with infectious melodies”. The New Yorker wrote “To watch this show is to enter, by some urgent, bawdy magic, an ecstatic and infinitely more colorful version of the famous surreal lithograph by M. C. Escher.” Awards and associations include Dramatist Guild Fellowship, Page 73’s Writers Group, New Professional Theatre Festival Award, Jonathan Larson Grant, Lincoln Center Emerging Artist Award, ASCAP Foundation Harold Adamson Award, Whiting Award, Helen Merrill Award, Outer Critics Circle Award, Drama Desk Award, Obie Award, Antonyo Award, a Fred Ebb Award, and a Windham-Campbell Prize.

Dr. Hedy Kober

Dr. Hedy Kober runs the Clinical & Affective Neuroscience Laboratory through the Department of Psychiatry at Yale University. Research in Yale’s Clinical and Affective Neuroscience Lab takes a cognitive-neuroscience approach to clinical questions, uses state-of-the-art neuroimaging methods, and organizes around a few interrelated themes: Craving, regulation of craving, substance use disorders, treatment for substance use disorders, neural mechanisms of change, emotion regulation in psychopathology, emotion-cognition interaction, and, importantly, mindfulness and meditation. She has presented to the World Economic Forum on the role of meditation in changing the brain’s default mode network in a way that makes us more resilient to stress and disease.

About Our Guide

Kevin Townley is a writer, filmmaker, actor, singer, and meditation instructor. His film and television work include appearances in My Super Ex-Girlfriend, Men in Black III, The Detour, and Law & Order. He has written extensively for the Waterwell theater company and for Rookie magazine. He has also led hundreds of art tours in museums across the country including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, and the Rubin Museum of Art. His first book, Look, Look, Look, Look Again: Buddhist Wisdom Reflected in 26 Artists is published by Lionheart Press and available at the Rubin Museum shop. (Members’ price: $27.39 incl. tax) www.kevintownley.nyc


Lead support for Brainwave is provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Major support is provided by Gerry Ohrstrom with additional support provided by Cheryl Henson.

. NYC Cultural Affairs
  • Ignorance

Attachment. Pride. Envy. Anger. Throughout this season’s Brainwave series, we have explored the four “afflictive emotions” that surround the center of the Vairocana Mandala, the inspiration behind the Rubin Museum’s innovative Mandala Lab installation. With Tibetan Buddhist teacher Khenpo Pema we may begin to see that the four afflictive states of mind have one element in common: ignorance. In conversation with the philosopher of cognitive science, Dr. Adriana Renero, Lama Pema brings the insights of the Vairocana teachings and compares them to our current understanding of how we relate to the whole and what our role in community could and should be.

Ticket holders have the opportunity to join author and performer Kevin Townley for a gallery tour prior to the theater program at 6:00 PM or directly following the program at 8:30 PM. Tours are 35 minutes and will explore the permanent collection and the interactive Mandala Lab installation which inspired the Brainwave: Emotion talk series. The program will examine how both sacred and secular art can help us to unlock the wild wisdom of human emotion.

Please note that this event may be filmed or recorded.

About the speakers

Khenpo Pema Wangdak was sent to the West in 1982 by His Holiness the Sakya Trichen as the first of the younger generation of Tibetan teachers in America from the Sakya School. In 1989, Khenpo Pema founded the Vikramasila Foundation, supporting the Palden Sakya Centers in New York City, Woodstock, NY, Philmont, NY, Englewood, NJ, Springfield, VT, Portland, ME, and Dayton, OH. The Palden Sakya Centers offer courses in Tibetan Buddhist studies and meditation. Lama Pema is the creator of “Bur Yig”-Tibetan Braille, and the founder of Pema Ts’al (English for Lotus Grove) Schools in Mundgod, India (for Tibetan lay children); Pokhara, Nepal (monastic schools for boys); and Pema Ts’al School in New York City, with a curriculum modeled on that of Sakya College, India. Khenpo Pema was recognized with the title of “Khenpo” by His Holiness the Sakya Trichen in 2007. He was the first Tibetan to ever receive the distinguished Ellis Island Medal of Honor award by the National Ethical Coalition of Organizations in May 2009. He has memorably participated in a number of Rubin Museum experiences, notably with Sir Salman Rushie in the Karma Chain on the High Line in 2011, and the Dream-Over.

Dr. Adriana Renero is currently a Visiting Research Scholar in New York University, Philosophy Department, as well as an Affiliated Research Scholar in the Philosophy of Mind at the Saul Kripke Center in the City University of New York, Graduate Center. She was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the NYU Center for Mind, Brain, and Consciousness from 2017 to 2021. She earned a Ph.D. in Philosophy from CUNY, Graduate Center, Philosophy Program in 2017. Adriana’s research focuses on the philosophy of mind—in particular on philosophy of consciousness, introspection, the mind-body problem, the knowledge argument—and philosophy of sounds and music.

About Our Guide

Kevin Townley is a writer, filmmaker, actor, singer, and meditation instructor. His film and television work include appearances in My Super Ex-Girlfriend, Men in Black III, The Detour, and Law & Order. He has written extensively for the Waterwell theater company and for Rookie magazine. He has also led hundreds of art tours in museums across the country including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, and the Rubin Museum of Art. His first book, Look, Look, Look, Look Again: Buddhist Wisdom Reflected in 26 Artists is published by Lionheart Press and available at the Rubin Museum shop. (Members’ price: $27.39 incl. tax) www.kevintownley.nyc


Lead support for Brainwave is provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Additional support is provided by Cheryl Henson.

. NYC Cultural Affairs
  • Anger

When we are blinded by anger, what helps us recognize the damage our rage wreaks on both ourselves and those around us? Ex-marine Richard “Mac” McKinney developed an anger fueled by lived experiences fighting in Afghanistan post-9/11, followed by fighting PTSD with little support from the military once discharged. A screening of the short documentary Stranger at the Gate reveals how Mac’s anger nearly drove him to commit atrocities against a local Muslim population, and how the simple kindness of that very community—embodied by community leader Bibi Bahrami—transformed his anger into reverence. Emotions researcher Dr. Tracy Dennis-Tiwary explores how anger obscures the clarity of how we are all connected and need connection in order to move forward in life. They are joined by filmmaker Joshua Seftel on the power that storytelling has to heal.

Ticket holders have the opportunity to join author and performer Kevin Townley for a gallery tour prior to the theater program at 6:00 PM or directly following the program at 8:30 PM. Tours are 35 minutes and will explore the permanent collection and the interactive Mandala Lab installation which inspired the Brainwave: Emotion talk series. The program will examine how both sacred and secular art can help us to unlock the wild wisdom of human emotion.

Please note that this event may be filmed or recorded.

About the speakers


Richard “Mac” Mckinney is an ex U.S. marine, who after 25 years of service, returned home to Muncie, Indiana. Consumed with rage, Mac developed a plot to bomb the local Islamic Center. After entering the mosque, and experiencing utter kindness from the community, Mac managed to transform his hatred to love, and converted to Islam. Mac went on to become the president of the Muncie Islamic Center for two years, and is now an active community leader. He has spoken across the country and serves as a Skills Coach at the largest community mental health center in Indiana.

Bibi Bahrami was born and raised in Behsood, Afghanistan. She came to Muncie Indiana in 1986 as a refugee during the Soviet war in Afghanistan to join her husband, Dr. Saber Bahrami. In 2002, she founded and became president of her own nonprofit organization, AWAKEN (Afghan Women’s And Kids’ Education & Necessities), in order to give back to the Afghan women and children she left behind. In 2021, with the increased influx of refugees, Bibi focused on helping Afghan refugees resettle and thrive in Muncie Delaware county. The organization MARRC has provided six months of urgent support to 115 people and 35 families with rent, utilities, jobs, and many other resources. Bibi is president of Islamic Center of Muncie. Her 35 years of community activism was acknowledged by the Vivian Conley Award for Humanitarian Service, the Indiana Women of Achievement Award, Ball State’s International Development Award, and the Rotary VIVA Award for Volunteerism.


Dr. Tracy Dennis-Tiwary, PhD, is an emotion scientist, Director of the Emotion Regulation Lab, and professor in the Psychology Department at Hunter College of the City University of New York. Future Tense launched at the Rubin Museum this past May. As Founder and CSO of Wise Therapeutics, she translates neuroscience and cognitive therapy techniques into gamified, clinically validated digital therapeutics for mental health. Her work in mindfulness-based stress reduction in at-risk youth is the topic of the documentary film Changing Minds at Concord High, a film first shown at the Rubin in 2013. Dr. Dennis-Tiwary has appeared on stage at the Rubin for six previous Brainwave sessions with Congressman Tim Ryan, the astronaut Scott Parazynski, martial artist Shi Yan Ming, mindfulness entrepreneur Rohan Gunatillake, artists Candy Chang and James A. Reeves, and former Texas Senator Wendy Davis. She writes for Psychology Today, and has been featured throughout the media, including the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, ABC, CBS, CNN, NPR, The Today Show, and Bloomberg Television.

Joshua Seftel is a New York City-based Emmy Award-winning director. His films include Taking on the Kennedys, Peabody-finalist Secret Life of Muslims, IDA Award-winning The Many Sad Fates of Mr. Toledano, and the political satire War, Inc. starring John Cusack, Marisa Tomei, Hilary Duff, and Ben Kingsley.

About Our Guide

Kevin Townley is a writer, filmmaker, actor, singer, and meditation instructor. His film and television work include appearances in My Super Ex-Girlfriend, Men in Black III, The Detour, and Law & Order. He has written extensively for the Waterwell theater company and for Rookie magazine. He has also led hundreds of art tours in museums across the country including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, and the Rubin Museum of Art. His first book, Look, Look, Look, Look Again: Buddhist Wisdom Reflected in 26 Artists is published by Lionheart Press and available at the Rubin Museum shop. (Members’ price: $27.39 incl. tax) www.kevintownley.nyc


Lead support for Brainwave is provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Major support is provided by Gerry Ohrstrom with additional support provided by Cheryl Henson.

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  • Envy

Can envy and jealousy lead to societal collapse? Comedian and deliverer of sharp political commentary Janeane Garofalo reflects on envy both in her realm as a performer and in the wider socio-political environment of our day. Dr Kevin Ochsner brings his research on emotion, self-control, and person perception to bear to the saying, “a divided house cannot stand.”

Ticket holders have the opportunity to join author and performer Kevin Townley for a gallery tour prior to the theater program at 6:00 PM or directly following the program at 8:30 PM. Tours are 35 minutes and will explore the permanent collection and the interactive Mandala Lab installation which inspired the Brainwave: Emotion talk series. The program will examine how both sacred and secular art can help us to unlock the wild wisdom of human emotion.

Please note that this event may be filmed or recorded.

About the speakers

Janeane Garofalo began her career as a stand-up comedian and became a cast member on The Ben Stiller Show, The Larry Sanders Show, and Saturday Night Live. She has appeared in more than 50 movies, with major roles in The Truth About Cats and Dogs, Wet Hot American Summer, Reality Bites, and Mystery Men. She has been a regular on television programs such as Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp, 24, and Girlfriends’ Guide to Divorce. Garofalo is an outspoken progressive activist. From March 2004 to July 2006, she hosted Air America Radio’s The Majority Report with Sam Seder.

Kevin Ochsner received his PhD from Harvard, postdoctoral training at Stanford, and is currently Professor of Psychology at Columbia University, where he directs the Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Laboratory. A co-founder of the Social and Affective Neuroscience Society, Kevin also is past president of the Society for Affective Science, author of more than 100 scientific articles, and editor of two books; he has received various awards for research and teaching, including the American Psychological Association’s New Investigator Award, the Cognitive Neuroscience Society’s Young Investigator Award, and Columbia University’s Lenfest Distinguished Faculty Award. This is his second Brainwave appearance at the Rubin.

About Our Guide


Kevin Townley is a writer, filmmaker, actor, singer, and meditation instructor. His film and television work include appearances in My Super Ex-Girlfriend, Men in Black III, The Detour, and Law & Order. He has written extensively for the Waterwell theater company and for Rookie magazine. He has also led hundreds of art tours in museums across the country including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, and the Rubin Museum of Art. His first book, Look, Look, Look, Look Again: Buddhist Wisdom Reflected in 26 Artists is published by Lionheart Press and available at the Rubin Museum shop. (Members’ price: $27.39 incl. tax) www.kevintownley.nyc


Lead support for Brainwave is provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Major support is provided by Gerry Ohrstrom with additional support provided by Cheryl Henson.

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