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  • MEMBERS TOUR

Members are invited to join Rubin staff for a free docent-led tour of We Tried to Warn You! Environmental Crisis Posters, 1970–2020 at our neighbor museum, Poster HouseThis tour will be held offsite and will be limited to 25 members. Registration is required to attend. To register and for any questions, please email us at membership@rubinmuseum.org. We hope to see you there!

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

Every poster in this exhibition is a failure—not in the sense that they failed in their intent of communicating a message, but rather that they were unsuccessful in modifying behavior.

 

These impactful images have relied heavily on a clear visual culture associated with most environmental messaging, creating a graphic sameness regardless of country or issue and drawing attention to distinct concerns. We Tried to Warn You! avoids these tropes, instead choosing to chart a global history of environmental activism through posters ranging in style from whimsical to apocalyptic.

Not yet a member? Visit our membership page to learn about the benefits of becoming a Rubin member.

  • MEMBERS TOUR

Members are invited to join Rubin staff for an exclusive tour of Gateway to Himalayan Art, the Rubin’s cornerstone exhibition and the model for a traveling exhibition that is part of Project Himalayan Art. This educational initiative, which also includes a cross-disciplinary publication and an online platform, aims to support the inclusion of Tibetan, Himalayan, and Inner Asian art and cultures into undergraduate teaching on Asia. Gateway to Himalayan Art invites you to enter into the art and cultures of the greater Himalayan region—Indian, Nepalese, Bhutanese, Tibetan—and the interrelated Mongolian and Chinese traditions. Much of Himalayan art is informed by Buddhist, Hindu, and indigenous religions, and images play a prominent role in cultural practices.

This exclusive tour is free to members of all levels. The tour will meet by the staircase in the lobby at 2:30 PM.

Registration is required to attend. To register and for any questions, please email us at membership@rubinmuseum.org.

Not yet a member? Visit our membership page to learn about the benefits of becoming a Rubin member.

Gateway to Himalayan Art is the inspiration for Project Himalayan Art’s traveling exhibition of the same name.

Leadership support for Project Himalayan Art is provided by the Henry Luce Foundation.

Project Himalayan Art has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Democracy demands wisdom.

This project is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Lead support is provided by the Ellen Bayard Weedon Foundation, Bob and Lois Baylis, Barbara Bowman, the E. Rhodes & Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, Noah P. Dorsky, Fred Eychaner, Christopher J. Fussner, the Estate of Lisina M. Hoch, Matt and Ann Nimetz, The Randleigh Foundation Trust, Shelley and Donald Rubin, and Jesse Smith and Annice Kenan.

Major support is provided by Daphne Hoch Cunningham and John Cunningham, Stephen and Sharon Davies, the Edward and Elizabeth Gardner Foundation, Mimi Gardner Gates, Hongwei Li, the Monimos Foundation, Edward O’Neill, The Prospect Hill Foundation, Sarah and Craig Richardson, Rossi & Rossi, the Andrew Sabin Family Foundation, Namita and Arun Saraf, Eric and Alexandra Schoenberg, Eileen Caulfield Schwab, UOVO, Sandy Song Yan, and the Zhiguan Museum of Art.

Special Support for Project Himalayan Art is provided by:

Dr. Bibhakar Sunder Shakya, to honor the memory and legacy of Professor Dina Bangdel, art historian, curator, cultural activist, and educator from Nepal.

Samphe and Tenzin Lhalungpa, to honor the memory and works of L.P. Lhalungpa, Tibetan scholar, broadcaster, and educator.

 

 

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this magazine do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

  • Members Tour

Explore notions of death and the afterlife through the art of Tibetan Buddhism and Christianity in an exclusive docent-led tour and “Last Look” of the exhibition Death Is Not the End.

The exhibition features prints, oil paintings, bone ornaments, thangka paintings, sculptures, illuminated manuscripts, and ritual items, and brings together 58 objects spanning 12 centuries from the Rubin Museum’s collection alongside artworks on loan from private collections and major institutions. The exhibition is organized around three major themes: the Human Condition, or the shared understanding of our mortality in this world; States In-Between, or the concepts of limbo, purgatory, and bardo; and (After)life, focusing on resurrection, ideas of transformation, and heaven.

The tour will meet at the base of the spiral staircase.

Registration is required to attend. To register and for any questions, please email us at membership@rubinmuseum.org

Not yet a member? Visit our membership page to learn about the benefits of becoming a Rubin member.

 

Death Is Not the End is supported by the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, Ellen Bayard Weedon Foundation, Robert Lehman Foundation, and The Prospect Hill Foundation.

The Rubin Museum’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of Governor Kathy Hochul and the New York State Legislature.

This project is supported in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

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