The Rubin

The Rubin Museum of Art offers schools new and inspiring ways to make curricular connections, inspire learning, and expand opportunities for students and teachers. We welcome all school groups, and offer a range of programs to meet your students’ needs.

Whether you schedule a guided tour for a school group, lead your own self-guided visit, participate in a professional development workshop for teachers, or engage in an art-making workshop, we can help you connect your students to the art and cultures of the Himalayas, India and the neighboring regions.

The museum’s school programs can enhance any subject area, including visual arts, English language arts, global studies, world communities, comparative religions, mathematics, and an array of social studies topics, as well as 21st Century skills like creativity, critical thinking, and global competency.


K-12 Student Programs

Explore the art of Himalayan Asia on an engaging 60-minute tour
Schedule an exciting hands-on experience to enhance your tour

Workshops are currently booked through March 2016
​Experience a free 3-session program for NYCDOE Title 1 schools
Learn about benefits for Independent, Private and Parochial Schools

Related Blog Posts

Teens Take the Rubin: Tours, Food, Art Making, and More
A recap of April’s ‘Unmasked’ teen event
Teens: 10 Reasons to Join Us for Saturday’s Free Mask-Themed Special Event
Don’t miss out on gallery tours, art making, food, and more
Recap: March Educator Open House
Learn about the recent experiences had by PreK-12 and university educators at the Rubin and find out about upcoming events
What’s It Like to be a Rubin Museum Intern?
Two Education interns reflect on what they learned, saw, and experienced during their time at the Museum
Tibetan Monks Create Sand Mandala Live
The Rubin Museum's Education Department hosted a weekend of activities dedicated to the many educational uses of mandalas
Making Connections: Mandalas and Math
Together with staff from the National Museum of Mathematics, our Education Department explored patterns, symmetry, and proportions in mandalas